Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to find the next available ID (or key) from a fixed list of possible IDs. In this case valid IDs are from 1 to 9999, inclusive. When finding the next available ID we start looking just after the last assigned ID, wrap around at the end - only once, of course - and need to check if each ID is taken before we return it as an available ID.

I have some code that does this but I think it is neither elegant nor efficient and am interested in a simpler way to accomplish the same thing. I'm using Ruby but my question is not specific to the language, so if you'd like to write an answer using any other language I will be just as appreciative of your input!

I have elided some details about checking if an ID is available and such, so just take it as a given that the functions incr_last_id, id_taken?(id), and set_last_id(id) exist. (incr_last_id will add 1 to the last assigned ID in a data store (Redis) and return the result. id_taken?(id) returns a boolean indicating if the ID is available or not. set_last_id(id) updates the data store with the new last ID.)

MaxId = 9999

def next_id
  id = incr_last_id

  # if this ID is taken or out of range, find the next available id
  if id > MaxId || id_taken?(id)
    id += 1 while id < MaxId && id_taken?(id)

    # wrap around if we've exhausted the ID space
    if id > MaxId
      id = 1
      id += 1 while id < MaxId && id_taken?(id)
    end

    raise NoAvailableIdsError if id > MaxId || id_taken?(id)

    set_last_id(id)
  end

  id
end

I'm not really interested in solutions that require me to build up a list of all possible IDs and then get the set or list difference between the assigned IDs and the available IDs. That doesn't scale. I realize that this is a linear operation no matter how you slice it and that part is fine, I just think the code can be simplified or improved. I don't like the repetition caused by having to wrap around but perhaps there's no way around that.

Is there a better way? Please show me!

share|improve this question
    
Where are the id's coming from? You could simply contain the full available set in a fixed list and take one from the list each time, until the list is empty. You just need a mutex to ensure two threads don't try to take one at the same time. –  d11wtq Oct 14 '11 at 23:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you've already searched from incr_last_id to MaxId in the first iteration, there isn't really a need to repeat it again.

Searching from 1 to incr_last_id on the second round at least reduces the search to exactly O(n) instead of a worse case of O(2n)

If you want to do it in a single loop, use modulo,

MaxId = 9999
def next_id
  id = incr_last_id
  limit = id - 1 #This sets the modulo test to the id just before your start point
  id += 1 while (id_taken?(id) && (i % MaxId) != limit)
  raise NoAvailableIdsError if id_taken?(id)
  set_last_id(id)
  id
end
share|improve this answer

Using a database table (MySQL in this example):

SELECT id FROM sequences WHERE sequence_name = ? FOR UPDATE
UPDATE sequences SET id = id + 1 WHERE sequence_name = ?

The FOR UPDATE gains an exclusive lock on the table, ensuring you can be the only possible process doing the same operation at the same time.

Using an in-memory fixed list:

# somewhere global, done once
@lock = Mutex.new
@ids  = (0..9999).to_a

def next_id
  @lock.synchronize { @ids.shift }
end

Using redis:

LPOP list_of_ids

Or just:

INCR some_id

Redis takes care of the concurrency concerns for you.

share|improve this answer

The usual answer to improve this sort of algorithm is to keep a list of "free objects" handy; you could use just a single object in the list, if you don't really want the extra effort of maintaining a list. (This would reduce the effectiveness of the free object cache, but the overhead of managing a large list of free objects might grow to be a burden. It Depends.)

Because you're wrapping your search around when you've hit MaxId, I presume there is a function give_up_id that will return the id to the free pool. Instead of simply putting a freed id back into the big pool you keep track of it with a new variable @most_recently_free or append it to a list @free_ids[].

When you need a new id, take one off the list, if the list has one. If the list doesn't have one, begin your search as you currently do.

Here's a sketch in pseudo-code:

def give_up_id(id)
  @free_ids.push(id)
end

def next_id
  if @free_ids.empty?
    id = old_next_id()
  else
    id = @free_ids.pop()
  return id
end

If you allow multiple threads of execution to interact with your id allocation / free routines, you'll need to protect these routines too, of course.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.