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I have a budding developer who is very enthusiastic about something he is calling “the matrix”

I am looking for peer insight

In a nutshell this is what we have:
- 1 highly denormalized table with about 120 columns
- Data points range from account, customer, household, relationship, product, employee, etc…
- One index per column: about 120 non-clustered indexes
- About 90% of all space in the database used by indexes today are indexes on this table
- Today about 1.5 million rows with a lot of nulls
- Table loaded with a stored procedure whose core is dynamic SQL
- All Field names are generic and do not describe the data
- A data dictionary type table is used with the dynamic SQL to load any data point to any field
- Field mapping is not static: today column dim_0001 is customer name, but tomorrow maybe something else
- No primary key
- No foreign keys
- No real constraints (For example all fields are nullable)

The argument for the table:
- Makes writing queries simpler because it eliminates the needs to write some join

The intended use:
- An End User Layer and would be a core component of a Universe build in Business Objects
- Post ETL process development

My recommendation will either kill the process where it is today (early development in a test environment) or move it to the next step in test.

Based on the research I have done, my education, and experience I do not support it and want the tables dropped as soon as the one or two processes that depend on these tables have been migrated to another solution.

Script below for your reference (I limited to one index example).

Any insight you can offer (even just a one word opinion) is valuable

-- The Matrix

CREATE TABLE [z005497].[tblMatrix](
    [as_of_dt] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [dim_0001] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0002] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0003] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0004] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0005] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0006] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0007] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0008] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0009] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0010] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0011] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0012] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0013] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0014] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0015] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0016] [varchar](100) NULL,
    [dim_0017] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0018] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0019] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0020] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0021] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0022] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0023] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0024] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0025] [varchar](103) NULL,
    [dim_0026] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0027] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0028] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0029] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0030] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0031] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0032] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0033] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0034] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0035] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0036] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0037] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0038] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0039] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0040] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0041] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0042] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0043] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0044] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0045] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0046] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0047] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0048] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0049] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0050] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0051] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0052] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0053] [varchar](11) NULL,
    [dim_0054] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0055] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0056] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0057] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0058] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0059] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0060] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0061] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0062] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0063] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0064] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0065] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0066] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0067] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0068] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0069] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0070] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0071] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0072] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0073] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0074] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0075] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0076] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0077] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0078] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0079] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0080] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0081] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0082] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0083] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [dim_0084] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0085] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0086] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0087] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0088] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0089] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0090] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0091] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0092] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0093] [int] NULL,
    [dim_0094] [varchar](12) NULL,
    [dim_0095] [varchar](12) NULL,
    [dim_0096] [varchar](12) NULL,
    [dim_0097] [varchar](120) NULL,
    [dim_0098] [varchar](120) NULL,
    [dim_0099] [varchar](120) NULL,
    [dim_0100] [numeric](20, 0) NULL,
    [dim_0101] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0102] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0103] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0104] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0105] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0106] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0107] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0108] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0109] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0110] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0111] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0112] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0113] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0114] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0115] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0116] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0117] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0118] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0119] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [dim_0120] [varchar](20) NULL,
    [lastLoad] [datetime] NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]



-- Index example

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [idx_dim_0001 (not unique)] ON [z005497].[tblMatrix] 
(
    [dim_0001] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]


-- The configuration table from which developers would find out what is in the Matrix

CREATE TABLE [z005497].[tblMatrixCfg](
    [dimId] [int] IDENTITY(100000,1) NOT NULL,
    [colName] [varchar](25) NOT NULL,
    [dataType] [varchar](25) NOT NULL,
    [dimName] [varchar](25) NOT NULL,
    [dimDesc] [varchar](500) NOT NULL,
    [dimpath] [varchar](5000) NOT NULL,
    [loadDate] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [modUser] [varchar](100) NOT NULL,
    [modDate] [datetime] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_tblMatrixCfg_1] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [dimId] ASC,
    [colName] ASC,
    [dimName] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
share|improve this question
1  
1  
Thanks Martin...there are so many parallels with what we are going through on this build. This quote sums it up...."The Vision systems best quality, flexibility, was least important to Upstart as a company, despite its attractiveness to Upstart's IT division. It was reliable enough, but it did not have the speed to fulfill its business requirements. This is a classic example of what can happen when the priorities of the IT "department" do not match, and are not appropriately aligned with, the priorities of the "business." –  santiago_jon Oct 16 '11 at 3:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Kill it if you can.

Also, that developer needs a lot more experience. And he/she should get it at another company.

It's basically violating so many things I don't know where to start.

Even if you end up fighting a highly normalized model which is following someone's best practices slavishly, it won't compare to the disaster which this design is going to create.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Cade, I appreciate your insight...I am a stackoverflow greenhorn...looking at your questions now to see if I can add any value –  santiago_jon Oct 15 '11 at 2:13
    
The generic field names are being sold as a feature, but seem like overkill because once a process depends on a field it can't dynamically change anyway (without changing the process) –  santiago_jon Oct 15 '11 at 2:15
1  
@santiago_jon I wouldn't even want to enter a discussion about what practices this developer would recommend for the lifecycle of an app based on this database architecture - you see stuff like this occasionally bandied about and it always ends up in tears. Stuff like this and EAV models (which do have their place in special subsystems) tend to crop of with developers who want to write "The Last Database" - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_One_(software) –  Cade Roux Oct 15 '11 at 2:25
    
Definitely kill this as soon as possible. It reeks of bad design, I can tell that the dba that is pushing this doesn't have much experience. One index per column is nearly useless and will kill any write performance. It looks like an EAV design gone haywire, I can see this becoming a problem way sooner then later. –  Britchie Oct 15 '11 at 2:37

Just to give one example of what Cade meant with "I don't know where to start" :

"today column dim_0001 is customer name, but tomorrow maybe something else"

This typically also means that in the User acceptance system, dim_0001 can be customer name (and the system might seem to work and get accepted), and then you move to production, and dim_0001 gets to be name of the president's wife or so, and then hours of meetings need to be spent trying to figure out (a) where the problem is, and (b) how to get it fixed in as little time as possible.

( (b) usually amounts to patching the code with stuff like "if col_name = dim_0001 then don't treat it as what the matrix says it is, but treat it as what is hardcoded here instead".)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Erwin. In talking with the developer he has mentioned that the idea for generically named columns came to him in part by looking at a couple of our configuration tables. For instance: a table that could supply a business user friendly method description on a processing results summary report. In a couple of those tables we have a small number of "just in case" columns that are at the ready when someone important from the business side jumps up and says "hey I want it this way now". Examples: "AltDesc1" (Alternate Description Alternate 1) and "AltDesc2" (Alternate Description 2). –  santiago_jon Oct 16 '11 at 4:41
    
When questioned, the developer reference this Wikipedia article (which of course has the Weasel Words tag): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_bus_matrix That article sounds largely theoretical to me and to my eyes where he has ended up with the matrix isn’t really what the author is describing. –  santiago_jon Oct 16 '11 at 4:41
1  
@santiago_jon In data warehousing, it's a tool to develop the logical model. In any case, a data warehouse is not used typically for transactional data. There can be some benefits to modeling some things in a dimensional form, but it solved very specific problems,usually for ad hoc queries and analytics. This model is not a dimensional model, nor does it correspond to typical normalized model - the only precedent for this is similarly ill-conceived ideas. –  Cade Roux Oct 17 '11 at 6:17

"What use is there for the Matrix?"

Well, I certainly don't get it.

I have never seen anything like this before and I don't understand how it is meant to be used or how the indexes is meant to speed up anything or how it is possible to query this table without using at least self joins.

Call me inexperienced if you like but this is a first for me. I would think that if this is the way to do things, the db vendors should not put so much effort into allowing us developers to define tables, with columns that have different data types, with relationships.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mikael. At this point I am in damage control mode looking to salvage what I can from his work: he is into it about 40 hours so far of company time. It makes me wonder how many joins he could have written with those 40 hours. Proabably three month's worth at our shop. That was kind of the holy grail at the end of this quest for him: elimiate the need to write joins. I still dont see how the matrix would do that: what happens when your WHERE clause needs criteria based on fields not found in the matrix? Dont you just have to bring in those tables anyway through a join? Seems like it. –  santiago_jon Oct 16 '11 at 4:58
1  
@santiago_jon count yourself lucky he's only got 40 hours in this. –  Cade Roux Oct 17 '11 at 6:17
    
Agreed. We care about the guy and want him to succeed. I plan to meet with him today and go over the peer review results. Feels like I need to shorten the leash a bit and insist he remain focused on solving the current business need. Wish me luck! –  santiago_jon Oct 17 '11 at 13:36
    
@santiago_jon - Good luck :) –  Mikael Eriksson Oct 17 '11 at 14:00

This is the result of trying to stuff an object oriented paradigm into a relational system. Document databases allow for this sort of programming:

Documents inside a document-oriented database are similar, in some ways, to records or rows, in relational databases, but they are less rigid. They are not required to adhere to a standard schema nor will they have all the same sections, slots, parts, keys, or the like. For example here's a document:

FirstName="Bob", Address="5 Oak St.", Hobby="sailing".

Another document could be:

FirstName="Jonathan", Address="15 Wanamassa Point Road", Children=[{Name:"Michael",Age:10}, {Name:"Jennifer", Age:8},
{Name:"Samantha", Age:5}, {Name:"Elena", Age:2}].

Both documents have some similar information and some different. Unlike a relational database where each record would have the same set of fields and unused fields might be kept empty, there are no empty 'fields' in either document (record) in this case. This system allows new information to be added and it doesn't require explicitly stating if other pieces of information are left out.

Trying to use this paradigm in a relational database is a "square peg, round hole" problem. A document database might be excellent for a highly transactional system, but analysis would be better served by loading the transactional data into various fact tables in a data warehouse.

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