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Task at hand:Consider a class ratingScore that represents a numeric rating for some thing such as a move. Attributes: A description of what is being rated, The maximum possible rating, rating.

It will have methods to: get rating from ta user, Return the maximum rating posisble, return the rating, return a string showing the rating in a format suitable for display.

a. write a method heading for each method b. write pre and post conditions for each method c. write some java statements to test the class d. implement the class.

I think i did what i was supposed to do, but it is a method and i am not sure that i put enough room for it to be changed much, this is what i have so far.

import java.util.*;
public class MovieRating 
{
    // instance variables
    private String description = " A movie that shows how racism affect our lives and choices";
    private int maxRating = 10;
    private int rating;

    // methods 

    //precondition: Must have maxRating, rating and description before you post it back to the user.
    //rating between 1 and 10, maxRating is set to 10, description of a movie
    public void writeOutput()
    {
        System.out.println("The max rating is: " + maxRating );
        System.out.println("Your rating is: " + rating );

        System.out.println("The rating for" + description + " is " + rating); 
        System.out.println("while the max rating was " + maxRating);
    }

    // PostCondition: Will write maxRating, rating and description to the user.

    //Precondition: description, enter the rating
    public void readInput()
    {
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("What would you rate the movie \"American History x\" out of ten");
        System.out.println(description);
        rating = keyboard.nextInt();
    }
    //postcondition: rating will be set to user's input for the movie American History x.



}

This is my Tester program.. not much so far

public class MovieRatingTester 
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {

        //object of the class MovieRating
        MovieRating rating1 = new MovieRating();

        rating1.readInput();

        rating1.writeOutput();

    }

}

SO did i cover what was told to cover? i think i did but i think i did it the wrong way, let me know please.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, my point of view is:

Your class, MovieRating is missing some basic elements of OOP, and that is what I think you suppose to learn in this homework.

The first element missing is a constructor method, what you did is automatically assigning each new MovieRating the same description. The job of the constructor function is giving a unique values to the Object when it first built in the system.

The constructor method is special, it is public and has the exact same name is the class, as we said, in this method you suppose to assign values to your object variables.

the second thing will be to put getters/setters, these are methods who has access to your private values and will be used to assign/get the values from them. Note the use of them in the code:

import java.util.*;
public class MovieRating 
{

// instance variables
private String description;
private int maxRating;
private int rating;

/*This is the constructor
  Note the use of .this - the expression is used to call the class form withing  
  itself*/
public MovieRating(String description, int maxRating, int rating) {
    this.setDescription(description);
    this.setMaxRating(maxRating);
    this.setRating(rating);
}

/*These are the getters and setters - get is used for getting the value
  and set is used for assigning a value to it*/
public String getDescription() {
    return description;
}

public void setDescription(String description) {
    this.description = description;
}

public int getMaxRating() {
    return maxRating;
}

public void setMaxRating(int maxRating) {
    this.maxRating = maxRating;
}

public int getRating() {
    return rating;
}

public void setRating(int rating) {
    this.rating = rating;
}

//This is a method for the printing commands - notice the use of the get methods//
public void printRatings()
{
    System.out.println("The max rating is: " + this.getMaxRating() );
    System.out.println("Your rating is: " + this.getRating() );

    System.out.println("The rating for" + this.getDescription() + " is " + 
                        this.getRating()); 
    System.out.println("while the max rating was " + this.getMaxRating();
    }

// PostCondition: Will write maxRating, rating and description to the user.

/*Precondition: description, enter the rating
  Note the use of this.setRating()*/
public void readInput()
{
    Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("What would you rate the movie \"American History x\" out of ten");
    System.out.println(description);
    this.setRating(keyboard.nextInt());
}
//postcondition: rating will be set to user's input for the movie American History x.

}

Using the constructor, you can create a different rating from your tester program

MovieRating rating1 = new MovieRating("description 1", 10, 5);
MovieRating rating2 = new MovieRating("description 2", 9, 7);
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Hey, i don't mean to be a nag, okay i understand what the getRating does, if you put it in the main file it will return the value of the rating right? What i am having a little trouble with is the this.rating = rating. Is that setting the rating to something else? So previous rating is 10, and setRating(15) will set it to 15 correct? And the last thing is what does { this.setDescription(description); this.setMaxRating(maxRating); this.setRating(rating); mean under the constructor. –  Renuz Oct 15 '11 at 3:50
    
You're not a nag. this. is calling "this" class. It is calling itself. so when you are calling this.setRating from the contructor, you are actually calling the setRating() method of the class, from the constructor, And assigning a value from it just as you figured. The other this. from the constructor are functioning the same, for different variables of the class. Did you understand ? –  Alon_A Oct 15 '11 at 3:52
    
Yes i believe so, but i am new to methods and they are very confusing to me right now, how would you use things like getMaxRating or setMAxRating from say the executed program, or is it only for the Main part of the program. Or is it we are creating commands to be used in the main part of the program, which is why they should be general and not specific. –  Renuz Oct 15 '11 at 4:00
    
Don't worry, it is normal to be confused when starting to learn about OOP. The more you'll write code, the more you'll get into it and understand. At this stage, don't think about the stage of the executed program, just focus on understanding each class. –  Alon_A Oct 15 '11 at 4:06
    
I am having trouble asking the user for input, I wanted to do something like... asking the person for each of the variables, the "description, rating, and max rating" But it seems that the constructor method needs the three set up first, Would i just give them like Blank/zero values and ask the user for input and just put the input over the initial constructor input? –  Renuz Oct 15 '11 at 5:06

You should not ask / print the data from the Ratings class. These ratings can come from user input, but also from database, web, etc.

1 Add getters and setters for properties of MovieRating

2 Pass the read and write methods to the main. Something like

 System.out.println("The rating for the movie |" + rating1.getTitle() + "| is " + rating1.getRating());

3 You are not aggregating ratings to a movie. You can't have two rating to the same movie (v.g., by different users) together. Convert the rating attribute into a Vector to solve it. Change setRating for addRating

There are many other things, but obviously this is a starters exercise and I do not want you to get confused. Work on these issues and check with your teacher.

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In general, it is VERY GOOD PRACTICE to separate user interface from data classes. –  SJuan76 Oct 15 '11 at 2:54

Java (and OO in general) is all about abstractions. You want to keep your objects as general as possible so that you extend your programs functionality without modifying existing code. This may be beyond what your professor was looking for but here are my suggestions:

1) Rating - separate this into its own class Again, the rating is totally separate from the movie - songs can have ratings, tv shows can have ratings. Today ratings can be 1-10, tomorrow ratings can up thumbs up or thumbs down, etc. A Movie "has a" rating. Let Rating decide how to prompt the user and how to display itself.

2) Now that you have a separate Movie class, I would take away the hard-coded title, description in my Movie class (this will let me create many movies and rate them).

Then I would eliminate System.out.println in writeOutput method (you can pass in the OutputStream to the function) By hard-coding in System.in you are forcing implementation. What if tomorrow your professor says "now, instead of printing to the console, print to a file or a database"? You have to modify the code. Actually, instead of writeOutput, I would override the toString method that all Objects have and then just call System.in(movie.toString()) in main.

3) Your test method doesn't "test" anything - it is just executing a statement. Typically a test method will simulate input, execute the statements, and check for the proper state at the end. A good way to signal that the state is improper (if your test fails, like maybe your Movie Rating is -1), then you throw an exception.

4) This is un-OO related and just a preference, but I would put both Pre and Post conditions before the methods. This just makes it easier to find in my opinion.

The idea of OO is that you separate responsibilities/concerns into separate classes. Each class is responsible for itself. This helps to keep your code more flexible and maintainable. Good luck on the assignment!

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