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data_cond.wait(lk, [this]{return !data_queue.empty();});

invalid argument after compile with

g++ -std=c++0x -Wall -pthread threadpool.cc -o hello 

originally from book is

data_cond.wait(lk, []{return !data_queue.empty();});
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2  
Can you show us the errors, at least? –  birryree Oct 15 '11 at 3:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That looks rather like code from my book: C++ Concurrency in Action, especially with the lack of [this] capture (a typo which will be fixed in the final printing).

Unfortunately, there is a bug in g++ 4.5 and 4.6, where the compiler cannot handle lambdas with [this] captures in class templates. This even applies to simple templates. You can see the problem with the simple classes below:

struct X
{
    int i;
    void foo() {
        [this] { ++i; };
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct Y
{
    T i;
    void foo() {
        [this] { ++i; };
    }
};

Both g++ 4.5 and g++ 4.6 will give "invalid type argument" errors on the lambda in Y::foo, but happily accept the same code in X::foo.

Hopefully this will be fixed in a future version of g++. In the mean time, I would suggest using an explicit around the wait call:

while(data_queue.empty())
{
    data_cond.wait(lk);
}
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this is exactly from your book –  M-Askman Oct 22 '11 at 2:33

Unless data_queue is a non-static data-member of the current class instance, and you are calling this line of code from a non-static class method, there is no need to attempt to capture the this pointer. If you are attempting to call your code inside of a function that is either an independent stand-alone function or a static class method, then there is not going to be any this pointer to capture, and you're going to wind up with an invalid argument error. The fact that the book you are referencing uses a stateless lambda (i.e. there are no captured variables inside the brackets) implies to me that you are attempting to perform an operation that is either not necessary, or impossible depending on the context of the code.

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no matter there is this or not, there is still an error, where is wrong in the code? –  M-Askman Oct 15 '11 at 7:25
    
Sorry, if this is not the reason, then you're going to have to show more code and the errors as well. I can't mind-read. –  Jason Oct 16 '11 at 14:43

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