Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I tried to implement an SFINAE using bool (unlike popular void_ trick):

  template<typename T, bool = true>
  struct Resolve
  {
    static const bool value = false;
  };

  template<typename T>
  struct Resolve<T, T::my_value>
  {
    static const bool value = true;
  };

The goal is to specialize, the classes which have static const bool my_value = true; defined inside it. If they are defined false or not defined then don't specialize it. i.e.

struct B1 {  // specialize Resolve for this case
  static const bool my_value = true;
};
struct B2 {  // don't specialize
  static const bool my_value = false;
};
struct B3 {};  // don't specialize

When applying the above trick on B1 it gives the compilation error:

Resolve<B1>::value;

error: template argument ‘T::my_value’ involves template parameter(s)

I am aware that this can be achieved with alternate ways. However, I am interested in knowing, why it gives compiler error here and can it be solved in this code itself ?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Actually what you're doing is forbidden by section §14.5.4/9 which says,

A partially specialized non-type argument expression shall not involve a template parameter of the partial specialization except when the argument expression is a simple identifier.

The trick could be using a type for second template parameter as well, encapsulating the non-type value, as described below:

template<bool b> struct booltype {};

template<typename T, typename B = booltype<true> >
struct Resolve
{
  static const bool value = false;
};

template<typename T>
struct Resolve<T, booltype<T::my_value> >
{
  static const bool value = true;
};

Now it compile fines.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution. I have edited some part and the example. For my specific requirement I wanted to explore bool trick rather than void_ trick for SFINAE. Also, if it's forbidden by standard then, I think I should accept this answer, because I don't see any other way out. –  iammilind Oct 15 '11 at 7:50
    
Well, the edit is okay. I thought you could use the member in bool2type, that is why I added it. But if you don't need it, then it is perfectly fine with me. –  Nawaz Oct 15 '11 at 7:52
    
Ahh, this is exactly the solution I needed for my problem. Question 15115109 I took it a step further by using std::integral_constant< typename bool, bool b >, and those that are directly available via type_traits' "::type" member. –  Charles L Wilcox Feb 27 '13 at 22:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.