Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have defined a class1 which is inherited from base 1. I have also defined another class2 which contains simila members as in class1 but this class inherited from base2.

How can I convert class1 to Class2?

One options is I have to assign one property at a time like

Class2.a = Class1.a;
Class2.b = Class1.b;
Class2.c = Class1.c;

Is there any better alternative in .NET?

share|improve this question
    
unless they share a common interface you have three options, 1) one line at a time. 2) use a tool like Automapper (easy to use and very flexible). 3) use reflection –  Gary.S Oct 15 '11 at 10:31
    
@Gary.S what would change if they did implement the same interface? As I see it, you would still have the same 3 options. –  Yannick Motton Oct 15 '11 at 10:48
    
If they implement the same interface you can use pass the interface around rather than the concrete implementations, you would not need to map if you could rely on it having the properties you needed defined –  Gary.S Oct 15 '11 at 10:51
    
@Gary.S Well sure, they wouldn't be interdependent, but how does that change the options? As I see it, it doesn't. –  Yannick Motton Oct 15 '11 at 10:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

if you have to do it between a lot of different types you could consider using AutoMapper

share|improve this answer

You can write your own extension method, like bellow:

public static class ExtendedClassPropMapping
{
    public static Y MapTo<T, Y>(this T input) where Y : class, new()
    {
        Y output = new Y();
        var propsT = typeof(T).GetProperties();
        var propsY = typeof(Y).GetProperties();

        var similarsT = propsT.Where(x => 
                      propsY.Any(y => y.Name == x.Name 
               && y.PropertyType == x.PropertyType)).OrderBy(x=>x.Name).ToList();

       var similarsY = propsY.Where(x=>
                       propsT.Any(y=>y.Name == x.Name 
               && y.PropertyType == x.PropertyType)).OrderBy(x=>x.Name).ToList();

        for (int i=0;i<similarsY.Count;i++)
        {
            similarsY[i]
            .SetValue(output, similarsT[i].GetValue(input, null), null);
        }

        return output;
    }
}

and use it like:

var test = firstObject.MapTo<class1, class2>();
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't recommend this approach. Automapper would be a much more robust solution, as it has a lot more conventions and creates a custom deserializer using il emit so it's a LOT faster. –  Yannick Motton Oct 15 '11 at 11:16
    
@Yannick Motton, I can't see any performance buttleneck in my code, also I think for the OP is good to see how to use reflection and some simple rules to do what he want, the code is not hard, So I personally using this code, instead of adding third party library to my project for such a simple problem. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 15 '11 at 11:27
    
Reflection is the bottleneck. While I do agree with the idea of minimizing the dependencies you take on 3rd party libraries, it makes no sense to reinvent the wheel. –  Yannick Motton Oct 15 '11 at 11:33
    
I'll add that this isn't really a Copy, it's more a CreateFrom specialized constructor –  xanatos Oct 15 '11 at 13:25
    
@xanatos, I want to name it Clone but I see it's not clone, I think copy is not bad, but seems your suggestion is better. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 15 '11 at 13:28

Your current solution is perfectly acceptable and is a very explicit way of mapping object A to object B.

Most mapping libraries like AutoMapper allow convention based mapping. If property names and types align, it will map for you with little to no configuration required. Depending on how similar the target objects are, this approach might still require you to do some work. The downside is that it's not as explicit and depending on the amount of manual configuration you need to do, you might just be adding complexity.

share|improve this answer

I am just piggy-backing from Saeed, but this is a tiny bit easier to use and read:

public static class ExtendedClassPropMapping
{
    public static Y MapTo<Y>(this object input) where Y : class, new()
    {
        Y output = new Y();
        var propsT = input.GetType().GetProperties();
        var propsY = typeof(Y).GetProperties();

        var similarsT = propsT.Where(x =>
                      propsY.Any(y => y.Name == x.Name
               && y.PropertyType == x.PropertyType)).OrderBy(x => x.Name).ToList();

        var similarsY = propsY.Where(x =>
                        propsT.Any(y => y.Name == x.Name
                && y.PropertyType == x.PropertyType)).OrderBy(x => x.Name).ToList();

        for (int i = 0; i < similarsY.Count; i++)
        {
            similarsY[i]
            .SetValue(output, similarsT[i].GetValue(input, null), null);
        }

        return output;
    }

    public static T MapNew<T>(this T input) where T : class, new()
    {
        T output = new T();

        var similarsT = input.GetType().GetProperties().OrderBy(x => x.Name).ToList();
        var similarsY = output.GetType().GetProperties().OrderBy(x => x.Name).ToList();

        for (int i = 0; i < similarsY.Count; i++)
        {
            similarsY[i]
            .SetValue(output, similarsT[i].GetValue(input, null), null);
        }

        return output;
    }
}

Then you can use them like so:

public Teacher ConvertInterfaceToClass(ITeacher teacher)
{
    return teacher.MapTo<Teacher>();
}

public void CopyTeacher(Teacher source, out Teacher destination)
{
    destination = source.MapTo<Teacher>();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although more readable, it doesn't actually do the same. Saeed's code aligned matching property names. Your code makes the assumption that the two types are identical in structure. Consider what would happen if the source Type had an extra property named A. –  Yannick Motton Oct 12 '14 at 13:32
    
@YannickMotton Oh! You're talking about my MapNew(), I forgot to put the typing back in there. In my version of his I kept it in there, but I'll have to put it back in the MapNew() addition. Thanks for catching that. –  Suamere Oct 13 '14 at 3:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.