Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a method to get the DisplayAttribute from System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations to show on a label for the property.

[Display(Name="First Name")]
public string FirstName { get; set; }

The method is working well:

string GetDisplay(Type dataType, string property)
{
    PropertyInfo propInfo = dataType.GetProperty(property);
    DisplayAttribute attr = propInfo.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<DisplayAttribute>().FirstOrDefault();

    return (attr == null) ? propInfo.Name : attr.Name;
}

The call of method can be:

lblNome.Text = GetDisplay(typeof(Person), "FirstName") + ":";

I can use a more elegant sintax using Generics, like:

string GetDisplay<T>(string property)
{
    PropertyInfo propInfo = typeof(T).GetProperty(property);
    DisplayAttribute attr = propInfo.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<DisplayAttribute>().FirstOrDefault();

    return (attr == null) ? propInfo.Name : attr.Name;
}

And the call:

GetDisplay<Person>("FirstName");

So, I would like to make it more more elegant using lambda expressions turning the call like this:

GetDisplay<Person>(p => p.FirstName);

The question is how can I achieve this?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is the method I use to fetch property name given by lambda expression:

    public static string PropertyName<T1, T2>(this Expression<Func<T1, T2>> expression)
    {
        MemberExpression member = null;
        if (expression.Body is MemberExpression)
            member = expression.Body as MemberExpression;
        if (expression.Body is UnaryExpression && expression.Body.NodeType == ExpressionType.Convert)
            member = ((UnaryExpression)expression.Body).Operand as MemberExpression;
        if (member == null)
            throw new ArgumentException("Selector must point to a property or field.", "expression");
        return member.Member.Name;
    }

Using this method you can just call the previous method:

string GetDisplay<T>(Expression<Func<T, object>> expression)
{
    return GetDisplay<T>(expression.PropertyName());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes! thank you! –  iuristona Oct 15 '11 at 13:01
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.