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The question is kind of hard to word, but here's the idea. I want to be able to do something like this:

A=M.make {|x| x+1}
B=M.make {|x,y| x+y}
a=A.new
b=B.new
a.eval(1) #returns 2
b.eval(1,2) #returns 3

Here is the class I have thus far, which doesn't work.

class M
  def self.make &blk
    Class.new do
      @@blk=blk   
      def eval *args
        @@blk.call(*args)
      end
    end
  end
end

if I do the above, here is what I get.

a.eval(1) #error
a.eval(1,2) #3
a.eval(1,2) #3

So clearly it looks like this is a scope issue, but it's one that I do not know how to fix. I'd like, ideally, for each class instantiated from a class made by M to have it's own scope, and of course, to have the write eval func!

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

if i properly understand your question, you can use 'Flattening the Scope' spell for this task and rewrite your code so:

class M
  def self.make &blk
    Class.new do
      define_method :eval do |*args|
        blk.call(*args)
      end
    end
  end
end

A = M.make { |x| x + 1 }
B = M.make { |x, y| x + y }
a = A.new
b = B.new
puts a.eval 1      #=> 2
puts b.eval 1, 2   #=> 3
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