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I am programming a service that has to force the download of a file.

I know the possibility of setting the HTTP-headers using PHP and then sending the file using the readfile-function. But I think this is not a good way for sending larger files because it would need a lot of server performance and the maximum execution time of the PHP-scripts would be exceeded.

So is it possible to send the HTTP-headers using PHP (I have to modify them depending on entries in a mysql-database.) and then let Apache send the file body? I have to add that I could also use perl scripts but I also do not see a possibility for doing this in a cgi-script. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

You can do this strictly with apache if the location and/or filetype of the download is known ahead of time:

<Location /downloads>
    SetEnvIf Request_URI ".attachment-extension$" FILENAME=$0
    Header set "Content-disposition" "attachment; filename=%{FILENAME}"
</Location>
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I need to modify the headers depending on entries in a mysql-database. This is not possible with this code and exactly this is my problem, Apache cannot force the download allone. –  Birk Oct 15 '11 at 19:15
    
Are there times when you would want the download file to be loaded not as an attachment? If the DB entries require the download, you can just forward the user to the filename and let apache take over instead of using strictly php. –  Explosion Pills Oct 15 '11 at 19:17
    
I really do need a server-side language because I need to modify the content-type-header and I have to save the files as an attachment. –  Birk Oct 15 '11 at 19:19
    
I found this link: jasny.net/articles/how-i-php-x-sendfile. X-Sendfile seems to allow exactly what I want to do. It redirects the body of the HTTP-response. It will Apache let handle everything. I will just install and try it. I will also post this as an answer in seven hours, when I am allowed to. –  Birk Oct 15 '11 at 19:28

because it would need a lot of server performance

I don't believe this is the case. As long as sending the file to the client is the last thing the script does before it terminates, the difference in CPU/RAM performance between sending the file from PHP and letting Apache handle it directly should be minimal, if there is one at all.

Unless you have a very large number of Gbps bandwidth on your server with an incredibly fast HDD setup, you would run into a bandwidth problem long before you ran into a server system resources problem.

Admittedly this discussion is based largely on conjecture (since I know nothing about your hosting setup), so YMMV.

the maximum execution time of the PHP-scripts would be exceeded

So just call set_time_limit(0);. That what it's for.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found this link: http://jasny.net/articles/how-i-php-x-sendfile/. X-Sendfile is a module which seems to allow exactly what I want to do. It redirects the body of the HTTP-response and will Apache let handle everything. I just installed and tried it and it works fine.

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