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I have 3 tables; CASES, USERS and USER_META. For this issue you need to know that the USER_META table has 3 columns; user_id, meta_key and meta_value

Each user is associated with many CASES and each USER is associated with many USER_META

My current query is like this

SELECT CASES.*, USERS.*, USER_META.*
FROM CASES
JOIN USERS ON USERS."user_id" = CASES."user_id"
JOIN USER_META ON USER_META_"user_id" = USERS."user_id"

The problem with this approach is that each USER has A LOT of USER_META so my result set has too many rows. How can I rewrite this query so that I can select only the USER_META where the USER_META."meta_key" is equal to a certain value yet still get the result if they do not have this USER_META."meta_key" set yet

For example:

SELECT CASES.*, USERS.*, USER_META.*
FROM CASES
JOIN USERS ON USERS."user_id" = CASES."user_id"
JOIN USER_META ON USER_META_"user_id" = USERS."user_id"
WHERE USER_META."meta_key" = 'my_key'

This would work great but not all users have a value of "my_key" in the "meta_key" column and we still need to view their CASE. For users that do not have the "meta_key" the result should just return the CASE and USER columns.

How can I rewrite this query so it gets the result for both users with this meta_key and without?

Thanks, I hope this makes sense.

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SELECT CASES.*, USERS.*, USER_META.* -- the resultset will include duplicated columns, which isn't a good idea. – onedaywhen Oct 17 '11 at 10:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would use a LEFT JOIN

SELECT CASES.*, USERS.*, USER_META.*
FROM CASES
JOIN USERS ON USERS."user_id" = CASES."user_id"
LEFT JOIN USER_META ON USER_META."user_id" = USERS."user_id" AND USER_META."meta_key" = ?
share|improve this answer
    
Great, it looks like I was putting the WHERE/AND clause in the wrong spot. Placing that logic in the JOIN statement is the solution. THANKS! – Mike Oct 15 '11 at 19:38
    
@Mike: The key has 2 parts: placing the logic in the JOIN and making it an (outer) LEFT JOIN. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Oct 15 '11 at 19:57

you need to use OUTER JOIN with the table that may have no results. In Oracle, use (+) near to the field name of the join sentence with this table. This link may help you: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28286/queries006.htm

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