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i have made an tag trigger function inside an anonymous function , here it is :

(function(){
  var getElement = {
    getElem: function(element , elemInterval){
      if(document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0].onload){
        element = document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0];
        clearInterval(elemInterval);
        element.innerHTML = ' content changed. ';
      }
    }
  }
  var element , elemInterval;
  elemInterval = setInterval(getElement.getElem(element , elemInterval) , 1000);
})();

what it got to do is to call a function as many time as it needs every one second and check if the first div as been loaded , than it save the element port to the "element" var and change the content of the div.

this seems to not work , what's the problem here?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're calling it directly and passing the result value to setInterval, which is undefined.

What you probably want is passing a function to setInterval, which in turn will call getElem:

elemInterval = setInterval(function() {
                               getElement.getElem(element , elemInterval);
                           }, 1000);
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I've tried it but it actually doing nothing , here is a live example : jsfiddle.net/NGnEd –  Mor Sela Oct 15 '11 at 20:47
    
@Mor Sela: That's because of your if clause. Why do you check for onload? jsfiddle.net/NGnEd/1 –  pimvdb Oct 15 '11 at 21:03
    
that's awesome man ! i though that the onload should give me true if it have been loaded , but i guess i was wrong , thank men. –  Mor Sela Oct 15 '11 at 21:11
    
@Mor Sela: No, you're checking whether the element has an onload="..." attribute, which is not really meaningful here. –  pimvdb Oct 15 '11 at 21:13

You call the function immediately and pass undefined (its return value) as the first argument of setInterval. Learn how closures work.

elemInterval = setInterval(function() {
    getElement.getElem(element , elemInterval);
}, 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried it but it actually doing nothing , here is a live example : jsfiddle.net/NGnEd –  Mor Sela Oct 15 '11 at 20:46

The problem is most likely that of scope - the getElem function is contained in a var, which is contained in the function block (which has a scope of its own as well). Interval functions need to be accessible in the global scope.

I'm not able to test this right now, but iirc, this would work:

var something = (function(){
  var getElement = {
    getElem: function(element , elemInterval){
      if(document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0].onload){
        element = document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0];
        clearInterval(elemInterval);
        element.innerHTML = ' content changed. ';
      }
    }
  }
  var element , elemInterval;
  elemInterval = setInterval(something.getElement.getElem(element , elemInterval) , 1000);
  return getElement;
})();

But that's a high level of indirection, you might want to avoid containing your function in another nested function.

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why you return this object in the end? –  Mor Sela Oct 15 '11 at 20:50
    
Because that's what gets assigned to 'var something' - without the return, something contains the function definition instead of the getElement object with the getElem method. –  fwielstra Nov 7 '11 at 11:21

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