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I am trying to figure a way to capture the first argument from @ARGV and check its validity by checking it against an array of known valid arguments. I thought I could do this with a simple foreach loop but I realized this won't work because it will fail when the first invalid match comes back, which for my example script is the second argument.

Here the code that pertains to the problem, its concept script so there is not much.

my $primary_mode = $ARGV[0];
primary_mode_check($primary_mode);

sub primary_mode_check {
    my @program_modes = ('create', 'destroy');
    my $selected_mode = shift;
    foreach my $mode (@program_modes) {
        if ($selected_mode ne $mode) {
            die RED "\'$selected_mode\' is not a valid program mode!\n";
        }
    }
}

Is there another way to accomplish the same idea? I am already using Getopt::Long in combonation with @ARGV to achieve a certain style. So I am focused on wanting to make this work.

UPDATE

I was thinking maybe I could match against regex, is that a possibility?

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Isn't $ARGV[0] the program name? Maybe you should say $ARGV[1] instead... –  Angelom Oct 15 '11 at 20:56
4  
@Angelom, no, $0 is the program name. –  ikegami Oct 15 '11 at 20:59
    
As far as I can figure $ARGV[0] is not the program name. I did not some simple prints to see what showed up and it was always my first arg. –  Solignis Oct 15 '11 at 21:00
1  
@Angelom Perl is not C. –  Sinan Ünür Oct 15 '11 at 21:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You code: Die if the arg doesn't match one of the allowed modes.

You want: Die if the arg doesn't match any of the allowed modes.

Put differently: Don't die if the arg matches one of the allowed modes.

my @program_modes = qw( create destroy );
sub primary_mode_check {
    my ($selected_mode) = @_;
    for my $mode (@program_modes) {
        return if $selected_mode eq $mode;
    }

    die "'$selected_mode' is not a valid program mode!\n";
}

But a hash simplifies things a bit.

my %program_modes = map { $_ => 1 } qw( create destroy );
sub primary_mode_check {
    my ($selected_mode) = @_;
    die "'$selected_mode' is not a valid program mode!\n"
       if !$program_modes{$selected_mode};
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Sinan Ünür, exists is not needed and only complicated the code. Accessessing a hash doesn't add elements to it, and even if it did, it would add a false value. Besides, if $program_modes{$selected_mode} created an element in the hash, so would exists $program_modes{$selected_mode}. –  ikegami Oct 15 '11 at 21:10
    
@Sinan Ünür, I never use unless since it's harder to process just about anything that followed, and the fact that I never use unless makes it all that much harder to read even in trivial uses. –  ikegami Oct 15 '11 at 21:10
    
Sorry about my autovivification confusion. I deleted my comment and upvoted your answer. Also, opinions on unless differ and I like it ;-) –  Sinan Ünür Oct 15 '11 at 21:20
    
can the hash be safely inserted into the subroutine? Once I am done validating the first option I have no need for the hash and could be destroyed with the subroutine. –  Solignis Oct 15 '11 at 21:26
    
Sure, call with check_primary_mode($primary_mode, { create => 1, destroy => 1}); –  Sinan Ünür Oct 15 '11 at 22:11
my $primary_mode = $ARGV[0] or die "No mode provided";
primary_mode_check($primary_mode);

sub primary_mode_check {
    my $selected_mode = shift;
    my @program_modes = ('create', 'destroy');
    die "'$selected_mode' is not a valid program mode!\n"
        unless grep { $selected_mode eq $_ } @program_modes;
}

If you are using perl 5.10 or greater:

use v5.10;
my $primary_mode = $ARGV[0] or die "No mode provided";
my @program_modes = qw(create destroy);
die "'$selected_mode' is not a valid program mode!\n"
    unless $primary_mode ~~ @program_modes;
share|improve this answer

You might find App::Cmd useful for easy writing of application with commands.

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If you like App::Cmd, take a look at p3rl.org/App::Rad. –  Naveed Oct 17 '11 at 2:59
    
@Naveed - Looks interesting, thanks for bringing it up. –  bvr Oct 19 '11 at 2:24

I would recommend going with a hash of allowed modes. In addition, pass the allowed modes to the function rather than embedding them in the function.

You can also use grep for this purpose if the allowed modes are in an array:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use warnings; use strict;

my ($primary_mode) = @ARGV;
my $allowed_modes = [qw(create destroy)];

check_primary_mode($primary_mode, $allowed_modes)
    or die sprintf "%s is not a valid program mode\n", $primary_mode;

sub check_primary_mode {
    my ($mode, $allowed) = @_;
    return grep $mode eq $_, @$allowed;
}

However, grep will go through the entire array even though we need just one match. List::MoreUtils::first_index will short-circuit once a match is found (it does not matter if you have only two possible modes, but in the more general case, it might):

use List::MoreUtils qw( first_index );

... 

sub check_primary_mode {
    my ($mode, $allowed) = @_;
    return (0 <= first_index { $mode eq $_ } @$allowed);
}
share|improve this answer
my $primary_mode = $ARGV[0];
primary_mode_check($primary_mode);

sub primary_mode_check {
    my %program_modes; @program_modes{qw(create destroy)}=();
    my $selected_mode = shift;
       die RED "\'$selected_mode\' is not a valid program mode!\n"
    unless exists $program_modes{$selected_mode};
}
share|improve this answer

I often use this idiom in such a case:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $cmd = shift @ARGV;
my @allowed = qw/ install uninstall check purge /;

die "Cannot understand command" unless ( grep { $cmd eq $_ } @allowed );

Edit: reading more carefully it looks quite a bit like Sinan's, and he's right, using first would search faster in a large list of possible ops.

share|improve this answer
    
The 1 == seems unnecessary. –  Naveed Oct 17 '11 at 0:51
    
I remember, its for validating when you want to allow shortened versions: $cmd = <>; @found = grep { $_ =~ /^$cmd/i } @allowed; die "Cannot understand command" unless (1 == @found); $cmd = $found[0]; so you can use y for Yes, but die if Yell is also allowed. TLDR; you're right, not needed here. –  Joel Berger Oct 17 '11 at 1:00

Yes, a regular expression should work. For example:

my @modes = ('create', 'destroy');
my $regexp = join "|", @modes;
if ($selected =~ /^(?:$regexp)\z/) {
   print "Found program mode '$1'\n";
} else {
   die RED "\'$selected\' is not a valid program mode!\n";
}
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