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I want to write a vector class (or something other) on C++. And I want to use its methods from Java. How to do this? I want to use JNI for this purpose. But javah generate me c prototypes. I want to store data in the C++ use area and use in java only an interface without fields. So, the problem is how to store the vector data in C-code.

Note:

Simply speaking, I need to wrap C++ interface by JNI and to have this interface in Java.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You will need to have a C-callable wrapper around your C++ code. The approach is similar to how you would allow a C++ library to be usable from pure C. Here is a simple example (with no error checking at all -- do not use for real production code):

void * MyVectorCreate()
{
    return new MyVector<int>();
}

void MyVectorAdd(void * vector, int item)
{
    static_cast<MyVector<int> *>(vector)->Add(item);
}

void MyVectorDestroy(void * vector)
{
    delete static_cast<MyVector<int> *>(vector);
}
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But where to store the result from MyVectorCreate()? And where to take void * vecto for MyVectorAdd and MyVectorDestroy? –  itun Oct 15 '11 at 23:26
    
It looks like in JNI you need to handle void * as a long, casting back and forth as needed from C to Java and Java to C. –  bobbymcr Oct 15 '11 at 23:31
    
So, how MyVectorCreate should look like in Java? and when to call MyVectorDestroy –  itun Oct 15 '11 at 23:36
    
I'm not a JNI expert, but presumably you would return 64-bit longs instead of void* from your C code and capture those as Java longs. When you need to make a call back into the C code, you'd pass that long around. Inside the C code, you'd turn the long back into a MyVector pointer and use it as you would a normal object. –  bobbymcr Oct 16 '11 at 3:20

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