Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have zero experience with PHP. I run a wordpress site, and am trying to make one simple modification to the code. This is what I have:

    <?php
    if(<?php the_author() ?> == "Joe Man")
    {
    <?php the_author() ?>
    }
    ?>

I believe all variables start with a $, so what I have above in my if statement is not a variable. What do I do? I also tried creating a variable, as below:

    <?php
    $author = <?php the_author() ?>
    if($author == "Joe Man")
    {
    <?php the_author() ?>
    }
    ?>

Neither of the above worked. So my question is how can I get that if statement to evaluate? What I need is if the_author is "Joe Man", for the string "Joe Man" to display on my page.

This is the error I get btw:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '<'

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
PHP in PHP ... the new inception! –  Book Of Zeus Oct 15 '11 at 23:17
    
lol had no idea I had gone that far –  kyphos Oct 15 '11 at 23:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You may not nest <?php ?> tags. The correct code would be:

<?php
    $author = get_the_author();
    if ($author == "Joe Man") {
        echo $author;
    }
?>

Actually, the variable could be skipped altogether, shortening the code to:

<?php
    if (get_the_author() == "Joe Man") {
        the_author();
    }
?>

Note the echo to print out the author.

share|improve this answer
    
Surely you meant to echo $author in the top example instead of the_author(). It sort of makes the variable assignment pointless if you don't. –  calumbrodie Oct 15 '11 at 23:29
    
Hence I stated the variable could be skipped altogether. Though you are right. I'll fix. –  Second Rikudo Oct 15 '11 at 23:31
    
I understand now. But something strange is happening. Simply having this bit of code: the_author(); no matter where, displays the name on my page. For the shortened version, if the_author is Joe Man, Joe Man appears three times: once for the echo command and twice for the two instances of the_author in the code. –  kyphos Oct 15 '11 at 23:37
    
Then it means the the function the_author() does not return the author name, it prints it. In which case, you'd want to call get_the_author() which will return it. –  Second Rikudo Oct 15 '11 at 23:41
    
@Truth thanks - yeah I was (and am) being super pedantic. –  calumbrodie Oct 15 '11 at 23:44

Looks like you're using wordpress, so beyond your PHP-in-PHP error, your code wouldn't work anyways, as both the_author() calls will simply OUTPUT the data, instead of returning it for comparison. You'd want:

$author = get_the_author();
if ($author == "Joe Man") {
   echo $author;
}

instead. As a general rule, any function in Wordpress which does output has a get_...() variant which returns instead of outputting.

share|improve this answer

If the author is "Joe Man", output the author:

<?php
  $author = the_author();
  if($author == "Joe Man") {
    echo $author;
  }
?>
share|improve this answer
    
What you said works, but for some reason, running this bit of code: the_author(); no matter where, makes the name display on the page. Is there a way to suppress this? –  kyphos Oct 15 '11 at 23:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.