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I have a span wrapping a img element and another span element, which is used for the description of the image. I want the image to be on top and then some text below the image. I found a way using firefox specific css properties, but this wont work on any other browser. Is there another way to get this effect or mimic how it looks in firefox?

HTML:

 <span class="image">
   <img class="" alt="pic" src="pic.jpg" />
     <span class="img-desc">
       Call us today!
       <span>888-888-8888</span>
     </span>
  </span>

CSS:

 .image {
    float: right;
    width: -moz-min-content;
}
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1  
Use <div>'s instead? –  Sparky Oct 16 '11 at 0:29
1  
Sparky you have the best and most simple answer. Thanks –  Nils R Oct 16 '11 at 0:31
1  
@animuson to be fair sparky is right. here is the example that was suggested jsfiddle.net/2KANB/1 –  Nils R Oct 16 '11 at 0:42
1  
He said use <div>s i dont know what this division is. I am just assuming he meant to replace all spans with divs –  Nils R Oct 16 '11 at 0:45
1  
@animuson, I said <div>'s and he changed his <span>'s to <div>'s... what's the confusion here? –  Sparky Oct 16 '11 at 0:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change all of your <span>'s into <div>'s and it will work. That's because, by default, a <div> (block level) will cause line-breaks before & after itself, where a <span> (inline) does not.

http://jsfiddle.net/TbY4N/

<span>'s were designed for "inline" use and, generally, you shouldn't see them containing a bunch of other tags or block level elements. Although, you can easily force them to behave like <div>'s (block level), this is an issue of proper semantics.

Span versus Div according to the W3C wiki article...

"The div element, short for division, is the block level generic container. It is normally used to wrap around other block level elements, to group them together (see the next section for more of an exploration of this). It can also be used to collect together a bunch of inline elements and/or text that otherwise don’t logically fit under another block level element, but this should be a last resort."

"The span element is the inline level generic container. It also helps to inform the structure of document, but it is used to group or wrap other inline elements and/or text, rather than block level elements."

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1  
Thanks again :D –  Nils R Oct 17 '11 at 6:25
<span class="image">
 <img class="" alt="pic" src="pic.jpg" />
  <br />
  <span class="img-desc">
   Call us today!
   <br />
   <span>888-888-8888</span>
  </span>
</span>
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but i would have to add extra elements –  Nils R Oct 16 '11 at 0:44
    
sure, but a couple of line breaks never harmed anyone :) –  Tules Oct 17 '11 at 1:55

You can do this with css by clearing the image element. Once the image is cleared you can float the .img-desc (either left or right) which will be placed under the image. This should work for any width of image. In my example I've just used a default image making it 50px wide.

http://jsfiddle.net/2KANB/

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Your answer works! :D thanks –  Nils R Oct 16 '11 at 0:41

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