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I have been working on some homework for my java class and I am a little stumped on this last part. Basically the home work is teaching how to pass an Array around and the last part is to have a method that is passed an Array and a number that is going to be searched for.

This is the exact wording of what I need to do:

Write and test a method findAll() that creates and returns a new array containing the index(es) of every occurrence of a target value. Return an empty array of length 0 that contains nothing if the target value does not occur.

The code I have so far is:

public int[] findAll(int arr[], int num)
{
    int indexNum = 0;
    int arrSize = 1;
    int newArr[] = new int[arrSize];

    while (indexNum < arr.length)
    {
        if (arr[indexNum] == num)
        {
            indexNum += indexNum;


            for (int i = 0; i < arrSize; ++i)
                newArr[i] = indexNum;

            arrSize++;
        }

    } 
    return newArr;

}

public void printArray(int arr[])
{
    //use for each loop here to use each array element
    for (int e : arr)
        System.out.print(e + " ");
    System.out.println();
}

This compiles fine but for some reason I get an out of bounds exception.

Thank you for your help!

share|improve this question
    
Sorry to say but your logic is completely off, and you might want to scrap this code and re-think it on paper first, get the logic right before trying to code it. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 16 '11 at 0:41
    
Although I agree with your comment because the code isn't working and I have been writing on paper how this would work out. Your comment just doesn't provide much help. If you could possibly elaborate that would be very helpful. –  Clear_Vision Oct 16 '11 at 0:56
    
For instance, even if you re-sized the array, what is this code going to do?: for (int i = 0; i < arrSize; ++i) {newArr[i] = indexNum;} –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 16 '11 at 1:09

3 Answers 3

You are getting an out of bounds exception because newArr has room for at most one value. You need to create an array large enough to contain the maximum number of indices you need to return. Keep a separate int variable for how many you have actually found. After the loop, create a new results array of exactly the right size and use System.arraycopy to copy over the found indices into the results array and return that.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I understand what you are saying although I thought that is what I have arrSize doing? I have it incrementing every time it adds a number to the newArr so that it will make it as big as it needs to be. Do I just have that code incorrect to do that? –  Clear_Vision Oct 16 '11 at 0:49
    
When the program executes this statement: int newArr[] = new int[arrSize];, it uses the value of arrSize at that moment. When you change arrSize later, it doesn't change the size of the array that was allocated. –  Ted Hopp Oct 16 '11 at 1:09
    
That makes total sense! Thanks a lot. I am going to take another stab at it and change my code around to fix that. –  Clear_Vision Oct 16 '11 at 1:31
    
Thanks again for your help. I think I figured it all out! –  Clear_Vision Oct 17 '11 at 0:22

Try this on for size. Run this class, and it'll tell you what's wrong with the findAll() method that's in it.

public class ArrayFinderHomework {
    private static ArrayFinderHomework finder = new ArrayFinderHomework();

    public int[] findAll(int arr[], int num) {
        return new int[]{99999};
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        boolean success = true;
        success &= withEmptyArray_returnsEmptyArray();
        success &= withNoMatches_returnsEmptyArray();
        success &= withOneMatch_returnsMatchingIndex();
        success &= withTwoMatches_returnsMatchingIndices();
        success &= withFiveMatches_returnsMatchingIndices();
        success &= withConsecutiveMatches_findsAllMatches();
        success &= withOneMatchAtStart_findsTheMatch();
        success &= withOneMatchAtEnd_findsTheMatch();
        if (success) {
            System.out.println("It works!");
        } else {
            System.out.println("Sorry, fix the problems and try again.");
        }
    }

    private static boolean withEmptyArray_returnsEmptyArray() {
        int[] empty = {};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(empty, 99);
        if (matches.length == 0) {
            return true;
        }
        System.out.println("It should return an empty array if passed an empty array");
        return false;
    }

    private static boolean withNoMatches_returnsEmptyArray() {
        int[] noMatchingElements = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(noMatchingElements, 99);
        if (matches.length != 0) {
            System.out.println("It should return an empty array if no matches are found");
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    private static boolean withOneMatch_returnsMatchingIndex() {
        int[] input = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(input, 3);
        if (matches.length == 1 && matches[0] == 2) {
            return true;
        }
        System.out.println("It should find '3' at index 2 in " + stringFor(input));
        return false;
    }

    private static boolean withTwoMatches_returnsMatchingIndices() {
        int[] input = {1, 2, 3, 2, 1};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(input, 2);
        if (matches.length == 2 && matches[0] == 1 && matches[1] == 3) {
            return true;
        }
        System.out.println("It should find '2' at indices 1 and 3 in " + stringFor(input));
        return false;
    }

    private static boolean withFiveMatches_returnsMatchingIndices() {
        int[] input = {1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(input, 2);
        if (matches.length == 5 && matches[0] == 1 && matches[1] == 3
                && matches[2] == 5 && matches[3] == 7 && matches[4] == 9) {
            return true;
        }
        System.out.println("It should find '2' at indices 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 in " + stringFor(input));
        return false;
    }

    private static boolean withConsecutiveMatches_findsAllMatches() {
        int[] input = {1, 2, 2, 2, 1};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(input, 2);
        if (matches.length == 3 && matches[0] == 1 && matches[1] == 2 && matches[2] == 3) {
            return true;
        }
        System.out.println("It should find '2' at indices 1, 2, and 3 in " + stringFor(input));
        return false;
    }

    private static boolean withOneMatchAtStart_findsTheMatch() {
        int[] input = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(input, 1);
        if (matches.length == 1 && matches[0] == 0) {
            return true;
        }
        System.out.println("It should find '1' index 0 in " + stringFor(input));
        return false;
    }

    private static boolean withOneMatchAtEnd_findsTheMatch() {
        int[] input = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
        int[] matches = finder.findAll(input, 5);
        if (matches.length == 1 && matches[0] == 4) {
            return true;
        }
        System.out.println("It should find '5' index 4 in " + stringFor(input));
        return false;
    }

    private static String stringFor(int[] array) {
        StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
        result.append("[");
        for (int i : array) {
            if (result.length() > 1) {
                result.append(",");
            }
            result.append(i);
        }
        return result.append("]").toString();
    }
}

You can only do so much on paper. Sometimes you have to poke the code to see what's going to happen.

P.S. btw, don't try to make it all work at once. Just focus on working out one of the scenarios at a time. In fact, I'd recommend tossing what you have and starting from scratch with this as a guide.

share|improve this answer
    
This fails if the returned arrays are not sorted. Granted that the most likely solutions to the homework problem will return a sorted array, it is not part of the specification. You need to account for that when testing correctness of a solution. It also, unfortunately, won't help OP track down the out-of-bounds exception. –  Ted Hopp Oct 16 '11 at 1:27
    
@TedHopp: Yes, it's true that I've imposed an additional, unspecified constraint on the solution, but 1) I considered it a reasonable tradeoff since it will be simpler for the OP to understand the code this way, 2) I assume this the natural direction in which the problem will be solved anyway, and 3) the solution will still be correct per the original requirements. As for the existing problem, I just came back to suggest starting from scratch anyway since he's dug himself quite a hole. One piece of functionality at a time always works better. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 16 '11 at 1:40
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay so I fixed my code to work correctly. I for some reason think it could be done it a little less code. What do you think? It does work and outputs the correct information in the format that the instructor wants but he always brings up that it is good to have your code clean, clear, and correct.

public int[] findAll(int arr[], int num)
{
    int indexNum = 0;
    int arrSize = 0;

    // find all accutences of the target
    for(int x = 0; x < arr.length; x++)
    {
        if(arr[x] == num)
        {
            arrSize++;
        }
    }
    //create new array with the right occurence size
    int newArr[] = new int[arrSize];
    for(int x = 0; x < arr.length; x++)
    {
        if(arr[x] == num)
        {
            newArr[indexNum] = x;
            indexNum++;
        }
    }
    return newArr;
}

public void print(int arr[])
{
    System.out.print("{");
    int i;
    // print elements before the last, separated by commas
    for (i = 0; i < arr.length - 1; ++i)
        System.out.print(arr[i] + ", ");
    // print last element.  Careful here to handle length 0
    if (arr.length > 0)
        System.out.print(arr[i]);
    System.out.print("}\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your prof might not like that you iterate through the array twice. However, this is probably the most memory-efficient approach. At the expense of more memory, you can go through the array just once: start by allocating a temporary array of length arr.length. As you go through counting how many hits you get, also store each hit in the temporary array. At the end, allocate the final array of the exact size and use System.arraycopy to copy the first arrSize elements from the temporary array to the final one, which you then return. (This is basically what I suggested in my answer.) –  Ted Hopp Oct 17 '11 at 2:59
    
I don't know if I totally follow what you are trying to do. It sounds like your are making an array with the amount of hits but I need to make a new array with just the index number of each occurrence. So if the array was {1, 2, 2, 3, 1} and I sent it to this method with the number I want found being 2 it would actually return a new array with the numbers {1, 2} Would you still use your method to do that? –  Clear_Vision Oct 17 '11 at 6:28
    
Yep. The temp array would be 5 long. After the loop, its content would be {1, 2, 0, 0, 0} (the last three values never changed) and arrSize would be 2. Then you'd do newArr = new int[arrSize]; followed by System.arraycopy(temp, 0, newArr, 0, arrSize);. That fills newArr with {1, 2} and you're done. Like I say, this would be faster but would use more memory (at least temporarily). –  Ted Hopp Oct 17 '11 at 8:02

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