Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I check each character in a character array against a string? For example, I want to check these characters: !,@,#,$,%,^,&,*,(,),_,+ against the string af!a$co. Without regex, though.

Does this make sense?

public boolean IllSymbols(String newString)
{
   char [] data = {'!', '#', '$', '%', '^', '&', '*', '(', ')' };
   String str = new String(data);
   for (int i=0; i<str.length(); i++)
   {
      for (int j=0; j<local.length(); j++)
      {
        if (str.charAt(i)==local.charAt(j))
        {
             return true;
         }

       }

   }
   return false;
}

But when I check the word af!a$co in my main method

if (IllSymbols(newString)==true)
{
  return false; // false = text is illegal
}
else
{
  return true; // true = text is legal
}

The devil returns the string as 'true', meaning that it's a legal string. Maybe I'm doing something wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Your last piece of code is pretty clumsy. It can be simplified as return !IllSymbols(newString);. Complex boolean logic, huh? :) –  BalusC Oct 16 '11 at 1:08
3  
Your code doesn't look at the string that is passed in. It is comparing str to local, not to newString. –  Harry Johnston Oct 16 '11 at 1:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public boolean hasIllegalCharacters(String newString) {
  boolean hasIllegalChars = false;
  char[] illegalChars = {'!', '#', '$', '%', '^', '&', '*', '(', ')' };

  for (int i = 0; i < newString.length; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < illegalChars.length; j++) {
      if (newString.charAt(i) == illgalChars[j]) {
        hasIllegalChars = true;
      }
    }
  }

  return hasIllegalChars;
}

The idea here is that you start by assuming it's going to be false, and only set it to true if you find an illegal character.

If you want to return as soon as the first illegal char is found, then right after the line hasIllegalChars = true; you can add a break; statement.

To look at the opposite case, if you want to return true only if newString contains nothing but illegal characters, then you could flip things around, start by assuming it's true and initializing hasIllegalChars to true, and then setting it to false inside the nested for loops if anything that is not an illegal character is found, with this code (the for loops and method declaration is the same):

  hasIllegalCharacters = true;

  ...nested for loops...
    if (newString.charAt(i) != illegalChars[j]) {
      hasIllegalChars = false;
      // optional "break;" or "return false;" statement here
    }
  ...

  return hasIllegalChars;

...but in that case I would recommend renaming the method to "isAllIllegalCharacters" or something similar.

share|improve this answer
1  
Or if you want to return as soon as you find an illegal character, instead of a break put in a return. –  Jeffrey Oct 16 '11 at 2:29
    
Ah, yes of course. A return will work as well. :P –  jefflunt Oct 16 '11 at 2:30
    
thanks, it worked :) –  Macosx Iam Oct 16 '11 at 2:46
public boolean illSymbols(String newString) {
    char [] data = {'!', '#', '$', '%', '^', '&', '*', '(', ')' };
    for(int i=0; i<data.length; i++) {
        if(newString.indexOf(data[i]) > -1) { // if the string contains the character
            return false;                     // return false
        }
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Are you trying to check if some String contains any of the characters !, @, #, $, %, ^, &, *, (, ), _, +, in which case it's illegal? For pure ease of use and understanding, I'd suggest Guava's CharMatcher class.

private static final CharMatcher ILLEGAL_SYMBOLS = 
    CharMatcher.anyOf("!@#$%^&*()_+");

public boolean isLegal(String string) {
  return ILLEGAL_SYMBOLS.matchesNoneOf(string);
}
share|improve this answer

I prefer to use .contains()

....

for(int i=0; i < check.length; i++){

    for(int j=0; j < illegalChar.length; i++){
        if(check[i].contains(illegalChar[j])
        return false;
    }

}

return true;

....
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.