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Does this design pattern make a lot of sense? I originally had a single static class which returned a HashFunction for each algorithm implemented.

public delegate int HashFunction(int seed, params int[] keys);

But I then realized that I wanted several pieces of metadata along with each algorithm, so I created this interface:

public interface IHashAlgorithm
{
    HashFunction CalculateHash { get; }
    NoiseFunction CalculateNoise { get; }
    int Maximum { get; }
    int Minimum { get; }
}

An internal class implements the required interface:

public delegate double NoiseFunction(int seed, params int[] keys);

internal sealed class HashAlgorithm : IHashAlgorithm
{
    public HashAlgorithm(HashFunction function, int min, int max)
    {
        CalculateHash = function;
        Minimum = min;
        Maximum = max;
    }

    public HashFunction CalculateHash { get; private set; }

    public NoiseFunction CalculateNoise
    {
        get { return Noise; }
    }

    public int Maximum { get; private set; }
    public int Minimum { get; private set; }

    private double Noise(int seed, params int[] keys)
    {
        return ((double)CalculateHash(seed, keys) - Minimum)/
            ((double)Maximum - Minimum + 1);
    }
}

Which are created and returned in a sort of public static-factory class:

public static class Hashing
{
    private static readonly IHashAlgorithm MurmurHash2Instance =
        new HashAlgorithm(MurmurHash2Hash, 0, int.MaxValue);

    private static readonly IHashAlgorithm ReSharperInstance =
        new HashAlgorithm(ReSharperHash, int.MinValue, int.MaxValue);

    public static IHashAlgorithm MurmurHash2
    {
        get { return MurmurHash2Instance; }
    }

    public static IHashAlgorithm ReSharper
    {
        get { return ReSharperInstance; }
    }

    private static int MurmurHash2Hash(int seed, params int[] keys)
    {
        //...
    }

    private static int ReSharperHash(int seed, params int[] keys)
    {
        //...
    }
}

I would much rather be able to implement IHashAlgorithm on static classes for each algorithm:

public static class MurmurHash2 : IHashAlgorithm
{
    public static int Hash(int seed, params int[] keys) {...}

    //...
}

Unfortunately C# doesn't allow this, so this is my attempt at getting around it.

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I think you should use make a singleton if you need to emulate "static interfaces", which is looks like what you're doing, in a weird way though. –  Candide Oct 16 '11 at 4:02
    
Ingenu is right - a singleton is the only way to do that. You can of course choose explicit interface implementation if you want to keep the API tightly controlled. –  Marc Gravell Oct 16 '11 at 7:20

1 Answer 1

There's no way to fake static class interfaces and many times when I thought I need one I actually needed usual instance interfaces. You can't pass an "instance" of a static class around in C#, there's no way to give a function a "static" interface or even a static "class" to use static methods from it. When you call a static method it is always explicit and you "hard-link" your method to the static class you call and that is not a good thing.

Variability based on static methods is hard to unit-test. Classes depending on such variability are less flexible. Imagine if some function would use one of your algorithms explicitly from your static class. Such a function would explicitly couple itself to that particular algorithm.

public class SomeBusinessLogic
{
   public Result HandleDocument(IDocument doc)
   {
       // some transformations...

       int hash = Hashing.ReSharperHash.CalculateHash(seed, doc.Properties);

       // some other code ...
   }
}

Well, what's wrong with that?

  1. The class never explicitly declares that it depends on hashing. You need to know its implementation to reason about that. In this case it might not be very important, but what if one of the hashing algorithms is very slow? Or if it needs some external files on disk? Or if it connects to some external hashing service? It might fail unexpectedly when you call the HandleDocument function.

  2. If you want to use some other hashing algorithm for a specific document you can't do it without changing the code.

  3. When you unit test it you kind of test both the document handling logic and the hashing logic (which is supposed to be already tested by its own unit tests). If your tests compare the output Result with some value from a resource and it contains the hash value, then all unit tests for this function will be broken when you change it to another hash algorithm.

What's a better way? Extract an interface abstracting your hashing function and ask for it explicitly whenever you need to do hashing. So you can still keep your algorithms implemented as some kind of singletons as long as they are stateless, but the client code will have no coupling to hashing specifics whatsoever. And who knows, you might one day discover that you need some parameterized hash algorithm and you can just create a new instance of algorithm every time you need one.

I'm using your interface with a bit changed style:

public interface IHashAlgorithm
{
    int CalculateHash(int seed, params int[] keys);
    int CalculateNoise(int seed, params int[] keys);
    int Maximum { get; }
    int Minimum { get; }
}

public static class StatelessHashAlgorithms
{
    private static readonly IHashAlgorithm MurmurHash2Instance =
        new HashAlgorithm(MurmurHash2Hash, 0, int.MaxValue);

    private static readonly IHashAlgorithm ReSharperInstance =
        new HashAlgorithm(ReSharperHash, int.MinValue, int.MaxValue);

    public static IHashAlgorithm MurmurHash2
    {
        get { return MurmurHash2Instance; }
    }

    public static IHashAlgorithm ReSharper
    {
        get { return ReSharperInstance; }
    }

    private static int MurmurHash2Hash(int seed, params int[] keys)
    {
        //...
    }

    private static int ReSharperHash(int seed, params int[] keys)
    {
        //...
    }
}

public class SomeCustomHashing : IHashAlgorithm
{
   public SomeCustomHashing(parameters)
   {
      //parameters define how hashing behaves
   }

   // ... implement IHashAlgorithm here
}

All the client code should ask for hashing interface explicitly when it needs one, it is called Dependency Injection and can be done on a class level or on a method level. The caller or creator of the class will then be responsible to provide the hashing algorithm.

public class SomeBusinessLogic
{
   // injection in constructor
   public SomeBusinessLogic(IHashingAlgorithm hashing)
   {
       // put hashing in a field of the class
   }

   // OR injection in method itself, if hashing is only used in this method
   public Result HandleDocument(IDocument doc, IHashingAlgorithm hashing)
   {
       // some transformations...

       int hash = hashing.CalculateHash(seed, doc.Properties);

       // some other code ...
   }
}

It solves the problems described above:

  1. The class explicitly declares that it depends on hashing. Whoever provides the specific hashing algorithm knows what to expect on performance, resources, connections, exceptions, etc.

  2. You can configure which hashing algorithm is used for each instance of the business logic or for each document.

  3. When you unit test it you can provide a mock implementation of hashing, for example always returning 0 (and also checking that the method passes the expected values to the hashing algorithm). This was you separately check hashing and separately check document handling.

So the bottom line is, if you have some variations in behavior -- use standard instance interfaces. The code behind them can be static or non-static, it doesn't matter. What matters is that the places where the variable behavior is used will remain flexible, extendable and unit-testable.

P.S. There's also an aspect of "what's your domain". If you're writing some business application and you call static Math.Sqrt(...) here and there -- it's fine, since there are no alternative behaviors. But if you're writing some math library and you have several different implementations of square root with different algorithms or accuracy you'd probably want to wrap them into an interface and pass as instances of interface to be able to extend.

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