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I'm seeing some strange behavior with Scala's collection.mutable.PriorityQueue. I'm performing an external sort and testing it with 1M records. Each time I run the test and verify the results between 10-20 records are not sorted properly. I replace the scala PriorityQueue implementation with a java.util.PriorityQueue and it works 100% of the time. Any ideas?

Here's the code (sorry it's a bit long...). I test it using the tools gensort -a 1000000 and valsort from http://sortbenchmark.org/

def externalSort(inFileName: String, outFileName: String)
    (implicit ord: Ordering[String]): Int = {

  val MaxTempFiles = 1024
  val TempBufferSize = 4096

  val inFile = new java.io.File(inFileName)

  /** Partitions input file and sorts each partition */
  def partitionAndSort()(implicit ord: Ordering[String]):
      List[java.io.File] = {

    /** Gets block size to use */
    def getBlockSize: Long = {
      var blockSize = inFile.length / MaxTempFiles
      val freeMem = Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory()
      if (blockSize < freeMem / 2)
        blockSize = freeMem / 2
      else if (blockSize >= freeMem)
        System.err.println("Not enough free memory to use external sort.")
      blockSize
    }

    /** Sorts and writes data to temp files */
    def writeSorted(buf: List[String]): java.io.File = {
      // Create new temp buffer
      val tmp = java.io.File.createTempFile("external", "sort")
      tmp.deleteOnExit()

      // Sort buffer and write it out to tmp file
      val out = new java.io.PrintWriter(tmp)
      try {
        for (l <- buf.sorted) {
          out.println(l)
        }
      } finally {
        out.close()
      }

      tmp
    }

    val blockSize = getBlockSize
    var tmpFiles = List[java.io.File]()
    var buf = List[String]()
    var currentSize = 0

    // Read input and divide into blocks
    for (line <- io.Source.fromFile(inFile).getLines()) {
      if (currentSize > blockSize) {
        tmpFiles ::= writeSorted(buf)
        buf = List[String]()
        currentSize = 0
      }
      buf ::= line
      currentSize += line.length() * 2 // 2 bytes per char
    }
    if (currentSize > 0) tmpFiles ::= writeSorted(buf)

    tmpFiles
  }

  /** Merges results of sorted partitions into one output file */
  def mergeSortedFiles(fs: List[java.io.File])
      (implicit ord: Ordering[String]): Int = {

    /** Temp file buffer for reading lines */
    class TempFileBuffer(val file: java.io.File) {

      private val in = new java.io.BufferedReader(
        new java.io.FileReader(file), TempBufferSize)
      private var curLine: String = ""

      readNextLine() // prep first value

      def currentLine = curLine

      def isEmpty = curLine == null

      def readNextLine() {
        if (curLine == null) return

        try {
          curLine = in.readLine()
        } catch {
          case _: java.io.EOFException => curLine = null
        }

        if (curLine == null) in.close()
      }

      override protected def finalize() {
        try {
          in.close()
        } finally {
          super.finalize()
        }
      }
    }

    val wrappedOrd = new Ordering[TempFileBuffer] {
      def compare(o1: TempFileBuffer, o2: TempFileBuffer): Int = {
        ord.compare(o1.currentLine, o2.currentLine)
      }
    }

    val pq = new collection.mutable.PriorityQueue[TempFileBuffer](
      )(wrappedOrd)

    // Init queue with item from each file
    for (tmp <- fs) {
      val buf = new TempFileBuffer(tmp)
      if (!buf.isEmpty) pq += buf
    }

    var count = 0

    val out = new java.io.PrintWriter(new java.io.File(outFileName))
    try {
      // Read each value off of queue
      while (pq.size > 0) {
        val buf = pq.dequeue()
        out.println(buf.currentLine)
        count += 1
        buf.readNextLine()
        if (buf.isEmpty) {
          buf.file.delete() // don't need anymore
        } else {
          // re-add to priority queue so we can process next line
          pq += buf
        }
      }
    } finally {
      out.close()
    }

    count
  }

  mergeSortedFiles(partitionAndSort())
}
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What is the Scala version? –  Daniel C. Sobral Oct 16 '11 at 4:16
    
Scala version is 2.9.0.1 –  Mike Oct 16 '11 at 5:46

2 Answers 2

My tests don't show any bugs in PriorityQueue.

import org.scalacheck._
import Prop._

object PriorityQueueProperties extends Properties("PriorityQueue") {
  def listToPQ(l: List[String]): PriorityQueue[String] = { 
    val pq = new PriorityQueue[String]
    l foreach (pq +=)
    pq 
  }
  def pqToList(pq: PriorityQueue[String]): List[String] = 
    if (pq.isEmpty) Nil 
    else { val h = pq.dequeue; h :: pqToList(pq) }

  property("Enqueued elements are dequeued in reverse order") = 
    forAll { (l: List[String]) => l.sorted == pqToList(listToPQ(l)).reverse }

  property("Adding/removing elements doesn't break sorting") = 
    forAll { (l: List[String], s: String) => 
      (l.size > 0) ==> 
      ((s :: l.sorted.init).sorted == { 
        val pq = listToPQ(l)
        pq.dequeue
        pq += s
        pqToList(pq).reverse 
      })
    }
}

scala> PriorityQueueProperties.check
+ PriorityQueue.Enqueued elements are dequeued in reverse order: OK, passed
   100 tests.
+ PriorityQueue.Adding/removing elements doesn't break sorting: OK, passed 
  100 tests.

If you could somehow reduce the input enough to make a test case, it would help.

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That's the problem, it doesn't occur with small inputs. The first out of order record can start as late as 600K into the test. –  Mike Oct 16 '11 at 5:45

I ran it with five million inputs several times, output matched expected always. My guess from looking at your code is that your Ordering is the problem (i.e. it's giving inconsistent answers.)

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