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So for class we have to make a D&D 3.5 game, and for the first assignment I have to generate a Fighter character. The way I have the hierarchy set up in my head is character.cpp and it's child is classname.cpp where it has some attributes specific to the class since all classes share the same basic things.

Is that a good structure for it? If it's related we haven't done STL yet.

Another issue that arose is since my teammate will be making a GUI for the game he may also make a class called character. I thought to resolve this I would make a namespace. But if I make each of the files I make have their class inside namespace d20 in each of their respective headers would all of those namespaces be one and the same? I can't think of a very good way to word this question.

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This isn't answerable. It would help if you posted what you tried and explained the problems you're having with your current design. –  Pubby Oct 16 '11 at 5:21
4  
"So for class we have to make a D&D 3.5 game" Your school actually assigned something like that for homework? Implement the D&D 3.5 rules? And you haven't even touched on STL yet, even though one of your team members is already doing GUI work? Now I understand why so many C++ programmers turn out so badly. –  Nicol Bolas Oct 16 '11 at 5:24
    
Ok, I guess I didn't make it clear, my assignment is to roll a character and display the stats. The other part of the assignment is to make a map and put something on it, and be able to load a map from a file. Also, yes, the class is super disorganized. –  Portaljacker Oct 16 '11 at 5:33
    
Also we're making a super basic version of the 3.5 ruleset. –  Portaljacker Oct 16 '11 at 5:33
    
@Portaljacker What does roll mean? Roll as in dice? Are you displaying it to a console? What do you mean by map? –  Pubby Oct 16 '11 at 5:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's my best stab at answering you...

A good inheritance structure is very context specific, but the basic principle is a base class contains data and functions relevant to all the derived classes. Derived classes will contain specific data and functions to itself. In your case there will be a lot of data in the base class 'character' like all the character stats and functions that compute outcome based on stats (I'm assuming the rules of the game are generally class independent).

I'm also assuming when you say 'classname.cpp' you mean 'fighter.cpp', 'cleric.cpp', etc. In that case, yes, I would agree with making it structured that way.

STL doesn't really have a direct impact on coming up with class hierarchies, so I would say no, it's not related.

As for namespaces, anytime you specify a namespace it will be the same as anywhere else you specify the exact same name (which is what I think you're asking). You don't need to do anything special to make it the same namespace other than naming it the same exact thing. A simple example is as follows:

character.h

namespace d20
{
    class Character
    {
        Character();
        ~Character();
        //etc...
    }
}

character.cpp

#include "character.h"
namespace d20
{
    Character::Character()
    {
        // Stuff...
    }

    Character::~Character()
    {
    }
}

fighter.h

#include "character.h"
namespace d20
{
    class Fighter : public Character
    {
        Fighter ();
        ~Fighter ();
        //etc...
    }
}

OR (without the namespace keyword)

#include "character.h"
class Fighter : public d20::Character
{
    Fighter ();
    ~Fighter ();
    //etc...
}

Edit: Please note that in the second case the Fighter class is NOT is the namespace d20, it just derives from a class in that namespace.

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For your case I would recommend against inheritance, because inheritance is usually used two ways: where you always use the base class, and never upcast, or using inheritance. The first is not what you want, and the second can be slightly tricky. (Also makes multiclassing impossible) In the long run, a very generic character class will get you farther.

namespace d20 {
    enum classtype {warrior_class, cleric_class, rogue_class, mage_class};
    class character {
        classtype charclass;
        int hp;
        int bab;
        int str;
        string get_name();
        void hit(character* enemy);
    };
}

On the other hand, if this is simply a homework assignment, and you want to keep things super simple, inheritance with virtual functions might make simple programs easier.

namespace d20 {
    class character {
        int hp;
        int bab;
        int str;
        virtual string get_name() = 0;
        virtual void hit(character* enemy) const;
    };
}
namespace d20 {
    class fighter {
        string get_name() {return "Fighter";}
        void hit(character* enemy);
    }
}
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That sounds like a reasonable approach to me. Presumably classname.cpps would be better named as something like cleric.cpp, barbarian.cpp etc.

You could make your baseclass with a protected function like 'rollstats' to return a string containing stats. Child classes could then override that with a public rollstats function which calls the the base class' method and then append additional stats.

If your classmate is creating the GUI, he should be using your classes shouldn't he? In which case he should just be importing your .h / .cpp files and there's no need to necessarily worry about namespaces.

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