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I have to make a program which has a shared variable (counter with initial value = 35) and 5 threads. I have to make the program so that each thread accesses the value of the counter and decrements it by 1. This should continue until counter = 0.

This is what I have for the code so far, but the problem is that only one thread is decrementing the value of counter to 0.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#define NTHREADS 5
void *thread_function1(void *);
void *thread_function2(void *);
void *thread_function3(void *);
void *thread_function4(void *);
void *thread_function5(void *);
pthread_mutex_t mutex1 = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;
short int  counter = 35;


main()
{
   pthread_t thread_id[NTHREADS];
   pthread_t thread1, thread2, thread3, thread4, thread5;
int status, status2, status3, status4, status5;

status = pthread_create(&thread1, NULL, thread_function1, NULL);
if(status!=0){
    fprintf(stderr,"thread 1 failed\n");    
}

status2 = pthread_create(&thread2, NULL, thread_function2, NULL);
if(status2!=0){
    fprintf(stderr,"thread 2 failed\n");    
}

status3 = pthread_create(&thread3, NULL, thread_function3, NULL);
if(status3!=0){
    fprintf(stderr,"thread 3 failed\n");    
}

status4 = pthread_create(&thread4, NULL, thread_function4, NULL);
if(status4!=0){
    printf("thread 4 failed\n");    
}

status5 = pthread_create(&thread5, NULL, thread_function5, NULL);
if(status5!=0){
    fprintf(stderr,"thread 5 failed\n");    
}

//pthread_join(thread1, NULL);
//int x = counter;

printf("created all the threads \n");

printf("joining thread 1");
    pthread_join(thread1, NULL);
printf("joining thread 2");
    pthread_join(thread2, NULL);
printf("joining thread 3");
    pthread_join(thread3, NULL);
printf("joining thread 4");
    pthread_join(thread4, NULL);
printf("joining thread 5");
    pthread_join(thread5, NULL);                          

   printf("Final counter value: %d\n", counter);
}

void *thread_function1(void *dummyPtr)
{
   printf("Thread number %ld\n", pthread_self());   

while(counter>0){
   srand(time(NULL));

   int r = rand()%3;
  printf(" %d\n", r);
   pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex1 );
  printf("entered the mutex");
   counter--;
   printf(" %d\n", counter);
   sleep(r);
   pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex1 );
   printf("mutex unlocked");
   pthread_yield();
}

}

void *thread_function2(void *dummyPtr)
{
   printf("Thread number %ld\n", pthread_self());   

while(counter>0){
   srand(time(NULL));

   int r = rand()%3;
  printf(" %d\n", r);
   pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex1 );
  printf("entered the mutex");
   counter--;
   printf(" %d\n", counter);
   sleep(r);
   pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex1 );
   pthread_yield();
}

}

void *thread_function3(void *dummyPtr)
{
   printf("Thread number %ld\n", pthread_self());   

while(counter>0){
   srand(time(NULL));
   int r = rand()%3;
  printf(" %d\n", r);
   pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex1 );
  printf("entered the mutex");
   counter--;
   printf(" %d\n", counter);
   sleep(r);
   pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex1 );
   pthread_yield();
}

}

void *thread_function4(void *dummyPtr)
{
   printf("Thread number %ld\n", pthread_self());   

while(counter>0){
   srand(time(NULL));

   int r = rand()%3;
  printf(" %d\n", r);
   pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex1 );
  printf("entered the mutex");
   counter--;
   printf(" %d\n", counter);
   sleep(r);
   pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex1 );
   pthread_yield();
}

}

void *thread_function5(void *dummyPtr)
{
   printf("Thread number %ld\n", pthread_self());   

while(counter>0){
   srand(time(NULL));

   int r = rand()%3;
   printf(" %d\n", r);
   pthread_mutex_lock( &mutex1 );
   printf("entered the mutex");
   counter--;
   printf(" %d\n", counter);
   sleep(r);
   pthread_mutex_unlock( &mutex1 );
   pthread_yield();
}

}

Can anyone please help ? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Why exactly do you have 5 identical thread functions? –  asveikau Oct 16 '11 at 6:57
    
I was doing that part wrong. Now I have only one thread function and all threads access that function. –  Ashish Agarwal Oct 16 '11 at 7:24
    
Please run your code through a decent compiler with warnings enabled, -Wall or so, before you post here. I get 10 with gcc. Most important are about sleep and pthread_yield that are unknown. If I then use the correct headers, it immediately finds the error that Antti indicated. –  Jens Gustedt Oct 16 '11 at 10:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
int r = rand()%3;
/* ... */
sleep(rand);

r is a random number between 0 and 2, but you sleep rand seconds, which is the address of a function, which will be implicitly casted to an unsigned int - so the thread will sleep for a very very long time. Use sleep(r); instead.

Also, note that you read counter while not holding the mutex (in while(counter > 0)), which may lead to the program working incorrectly depending on architecture, caching and compiler optimizations. You should lock the mutex, read the value of counter to a local variable, then unlock the mutex and check whether the value is positive.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks. The program is now running. But now only thread1 is decrementing the value downt0 0. Is there anything else that is nor right ? –  Ashish Agarwal Oct 16 '11 at 7:07
    
Why do you think only thread1 decrements the value down to 0? –  Antti Oct 16 '11 at 7:09
    
Its because only thread1 has access to the CPU and as a result threads 2 though 5 do not get a chance to run. That's why I'm experimenting with yield and sleep so that other threads get a chance to run –  Ashish Agarwal Oct 16 '11 at 7:16

While Antti found a good one, I have a few more comments to make:

  • you don't need five identical functions. You can have only one function, and start it five times as different threads.

  • you are sleeping with the mutex locked. That means that the other threads will block while a thread sleeps. I think you want to sleep after releasing the lock, so that other threads can have at the counter.

  • You are reading the counter outside of mutex protection when you check the counter in the while loop's condition. You need to lock the mutex when you access the shared resource, no matter if you are reading or writing. If you don't then you'll have race conditions.

  • if you follow my advice and move the sleep after the mutex is released, then calling pthread_yield is not necessary, since a sleep also yields.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comments. The code looks a lot neater now. Why is it recommended to use a mutex lock even while reading. The purpose of the mutex lock is to ensure that data is not corrupted, right ? –  Ashish Agarwal Oct 16 '11 at 7:18
1  
the condition that you have in your while loop cannot be evaluated atomically, first the counter is read, then compared. Let's say thread #1 reads the counter and it is 1. Then there is a switch to thread #2, who also reads the counter and it is 1. Thread 2 continues and does the comparison, enters the loop and decrements the counter down to 0. Now thread 1 regains control and does a comparison using the value 1 since it read the variable before thread #2 decremented it. And your counter will be decremented again to -1. This is called a race condition. –  Miguel Oct 16 '11 at 7:28

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