Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to come up with a specific "test-first" testcase to verify a code change (it's a C/C++ app, if it makes a difference).

Presently the app requires ascii and/or "modified" UTF-8 encoding of strings: the NUL (0x00) character is assumed to terminate strings, and any occurrence of the 'nul' character within a unicode string is encoded as the two−byte sequence 0xC0 0x80 instead of 0x00 -- allowing continued use of legacy functions that assume nul-termination of strings.

But the app needs to properly handle (non-modified) UTF-8, where ASCII NUL (0x00) can occur in the middle of a string. All usage of strings needs to be modified to use string length, rather than assuming nul-termination.

My question is: What type of input can I use to create a testcase that fails before the code change, and succeeds after the change?

If possible (and perhaps this is the problem), I would like to use "realistic" input, for example valid character strings (in chinese or japanese, etc) rather than arbitrary binary data or bogus control characters. The existing "unicode test pages" across the internets don't seem to cover this case....

share|improve this question
    
Homework ? Smells like it. –  wildplasser Oct 16 '11 at 10:00
    
Strange question. Trying to come up with a real utf8 string that has an embedded 0 is going to be difficult. –  Hans Passant Oct 16 '11 at 10:25
1  
This smells like a perfectly legit question to me: it’s important to use real not bogus UTF‑8. The U+0000 code point is a Control character, and as such, is unlikely to appear in actual text. Of course, you need to be prepared to cope with all possible Unicode code points, even controls, unassigned, and private-use characters. Noncharacters are not supposed to be interchanged, but sometimes might be. Only surrogates alone are forbidden, as of course are non‐shortest and other illegal encoding forms. –  tchrist Oct 16 '11 at 14:37
    
This smells like a perfectly legit question to me: it’s important to use real not bogus UTF‑8. The U+0000 code point is a Control character, and as such, is unlikely to appear in actual text. Of course, you need to be prepared to all possible Unicode code points, even controls, unassigned, and private-use characters. Noncharacters are not supposed to be interchanged, but sometimes might be. Only surrogates alone are forbidden, as of course are non‐shortest and other illegal encoding forms. –  tchrist Oct 16 '11 at 14:39
    
If you need to be able to encode U+0000 in the actual text then how are you doing that in ASCII? Because the ASCII and UTF-8 encodings of U+0000 are the same. On the other hand, if you don't really need to encode U+0000 in ASCII then why do you need to do so in UTF-8? –  bames53 Oct 16 '11 at 21:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So you want to test if your application can handle non-terminating null bytes. However, one of the design criteria for UTF-8 is that null bytes don't occur except when encoding the null character (U+0000). Null bytes do not appear in Chinese, Japanese, or anywhere in UTF-8 except for the place where null bytes also occur in ASCII encoded data; encoding the null character. Therefore, in order to test the program you have to send it input that contains the null character.

You are probably correct that this conflicts with your desire to use realistic input.

I suspect that the developer that originally made the program use modified UTF-8 was simply under the misconception that UTF-8 is different from ASCII in regards to encoding the null character, and that the program might have to deal with U+0000 in UTF-8 when it would not in ASCII.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @bames53 (sorry for previous misspellings), I think that has to be the answer. I'll mark it as such... I appreciate all your help on this question. But if I could ask a follow-up (yet, it sort of changes the nature of the question a little): can the same answer be applied if the input were CESU-8 (which is itself a modified form of UTF-8)? But perhaps not UTF-16? (Just to compare/contrast the design criteria & features of UTF-8 with other encodings.) (I'd understand if that question doesn't make sense.) Thanks again for your help. –  michael_n Oct 18 '11 at 2:28
    
I'm not exactly sure what you're asking in regards to CESU-8 or UTF-16. I think CESU-8 exists for two reasons, one of them similar to the modified UTF-8 encoding; in order to sneak some data into some place it normally wouldn't be allowed. The second reason is probably because some old programs just didn't implement UTF-8 correctly (or at the time they implemented UTF-8, surrogate pairs didn't exist), and clients of those programs just have to know how to deal with it. –  bames53 Oct 18 '11 at 3:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.