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I need to develop an helper class on top of org.apache.httpclient for my android application. Following code works fine for android, but not for JavaSE 1.6 in my PC.

Question is: Can I use org.apache.httpclient both for android and for PC? If I cant: what is your http client library advise? I want to develop one helper class and use it at all.

Here is the code that works fine in android but some classes cannot be resolved for on Java SE 1.6.

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

import org.apache.http.HttpEntity;
import org.apache.http.HttpResponse;
import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient;
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpGet;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultHttpClient;

public class HTTPClient {

public static void connect(String url)
{

    HttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();

    // Prepare a request object
    HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet(url); 

    // Execute the request
    HttpResponse response;
    try {
        response = httpclient.execute(httpget);

        // Examine the response status

        // Get hold of the response entity
        HttpEntity entity = response.getEntity();
        // If the response does not enclose an entity, there is no need
        // to worry about connection release

        if (entity != null) {

            // A Simple JSON Response Read
            InputStream instream = entity.getContent();

            String result= convertStreamToString(instream);
            // now you have the string representation of the HTML request
            instream.close();
        }


    } catch (Exception e) {}
}

    private static String convertStreamToString(InputStream is) {
    /*
     * To convert the InputStream to String we use the BufferedReader.readLine()
     * method. We iterate until the BufferedReader return null which means
     * there's no more data to read. Each line will appended to a StringBuilder
     * and returned as String.
     */
    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(is));
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    String line = null;
    try {
        while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
            sb.append(line + "\n");
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            is.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
}
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Add the error/exception to your question. –  Lukas Knuth Oct 16 '11 at 10:30
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1 Answer 1

Yes you can, you should avoid naming your client helper class as the same thing as an already defined class. Although Java is case sensitive, it is confusing will trip you up when you least expect it. It may even be guilty for causing this problem. Why not call it HttpClientHelper as that is what it truly is.

Here's an example of HttpClient http://hc.apache.org/httpclient-3.x/tutorial.html

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