Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I know you can add custom keymappings to vim with imap in the .vimrc file. My question is, if one is to create additional custom operators, motions, commands and map them to keys, what is the best way to add them in so they don't conflict with existing bindings?

An analogy, in emacs, a lot of custom key commands are added via the C-c sequence. To be more technical, are there unbound keys in vim that allow for user customization? In other words, is there a free keyspace available to users?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

:imapEnter will show a list of your insert mode mappings.

My question is, if one is to create additional custom operators, motions, commands and map them to keys, what is the best way to add them in so they don't conflict with existing bindings?

In my opinion the best way is creating custom command, they start with uppercase, native ones with lowercase.


Additionally, you can use a <leader> I use , some use \.

e.g. :let mapleader = ","

then, you can use the leader to combine it with other keys, like ,p to call a command, native or custom, see below:

:map <leader>p :MyCustomCommand<CR>

A custom motion example. Delete the third word after the cursor.

nnoremap <leader>x :normal 2wdw<CR>


Several commands can be used to create new, remove and list the mappings, here is a list of working modes, from :help map-overview

                                        Normal  Visual+Select  Operator-pending ~
:map   :noremap   :unmap   :mapclear     yes      yes                yes
:nmap  :nnoremap  :nunmap  :nmapclear    yes       -                  -
:vmap  :vnoremap  :vunmap  :vmapclear     -       yes                 -
:omap  :onoremap  :ounmap  :omapclear     -        -                 yes

further info :help map


Here's an example function, converted to a custom command

function! MoveLastLines(f)
  exe '$-9,$w ' . a:f    "write last ten lines to the passed filename
  $-9,$d                 "delete last ten lines
endfunction

command! -nargs=1 -range MoveTo :call MoveLastLines(<f-args>)

Now, both lines below are equivalent

  • :call MoveLastLines('newFile.txt')
  • :MoveTo newFile.txt
share|improve this answer
    
That's a very nice answer. I use mappings (with <Leader>) for things I know I will need a lot and keep other less used function as commands. Also the `` mapleader is like that by default. –  romainl Oct 16 '11 at 19:13
    
@romainl: nice answer but not complete, because it does not mention that :nunmap can also be used outside of a monastery. (:help map-modes) –  Benoit Oct 17 '11 at 14:19
    
@Benoit, I'm very sorry I missed this detail. As it turns out I was busy looking for my spoon while reading Eric's answer. –  romainl Oct 17 '11 at 16:04
    
@romainl Can anybody explain what is the point of using <leader> anywhere outside published plugins? –  ZyX Oct 18 '11 at 18:23
    
@ZyX I remember you don't like it. I personally use <leader> because it gives me a very large set of possibilities for creating my own mappings. Obviously I could use a common "prefix" like _ or some other available or rarely used key (by me) or even function keys for that purpose but I like to have the same prefix for all those non-native features I use daily. Weither I get them from a plugin or from carefully edited macros or simple things like "_dP. However I've only been using Vim for about a year and it's entirely possible that I'm doing things wrong. Why only in plugins? –  romainl Oct 18 '11 at 19:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.