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I am new to Javascript. I have set a couple of buttons on a page, like this:

<div id='MID_1_4'>
    <div id="login">logout</div>
    <button type="button" id="logout" onclick="loadXMLDoc2()">Logout</button>
</div>
...

I want to extract the id of the button who called loadXMLDoc2(). This method is defined as following:

function loadXMLDoc2() {

    var retr = $(this).attr("id");
    document.getElementById("L1_LEFT").innerHTML
        = retr;

}

Yet, L1_LEFT is set to undefined when I click on buttons. I thought $(this) meant "the current HTML element". If it is not the button then what is it? And how can I extract the button's id?

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If you call a function "normally", which you do with loadXMLDoc2(), then this refers to window. You might want to read more about this. $(this) means create a jQuery object from whatever this refers to. Are you using jQuery? –  Felix Kling Oct 16 '11 at 17:07
1  
possible duplicate of Access the clicked element –  Felix Kling Oct 16 '11 at 17:08
    
You might want to just bind the event like $("#logout").click(loadXMLDoc2); then this refers to the element. –  pimvdb Oct 16 '11 at 17:08
    
@Felix Yes, I am learning to use JQuery too. I am not obsessed about using $(this) if it is not the recommended way. Just learning. –  JVerstry Oct 16 '11 at 17:14
1  
@JVerstry: Yes, exactly. That's what is usually done when using jQuery to bind functions to events. –  pimvdb Oct 16 '11 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

this refers to window (the global object) inside the function, this refers to the element in the onclick handler.

while it's bad approach to do javascript in html, try this:

<div id='MID_1_4'>
    <div id="login">logout</div>
    <button type="button" id="logout" onclick="loadXMLDoc2(this)">Logout</button>
</div>

function loadXMLDoc2(elm) {

    var retr = elm.id;
    document.getElementById("L1_LEFT").innerHTML
    = retr;

}

A better approach is to separate HTML and javascript:

<div id='MID_1_4'>
    <div id="login">logout</div>
    <button type="button" id="logout">Logout</button>
</div>

(Somewhere in js file )

function loadXMLDoc2(elm) {

    var retr = elm.id;
    document.getElementById("L1_LEFT").innerHTML = retr;

}

$( document ).ready( function(){
//This function is executed after all elements on the page are ready to be manipulated

    $( "#logout" ).bind( "click",
        function(){
        loadXMLDoc2( this );
        }
    );
});
share|improve this answer
    
It works, but you say it is a bad approach. What would be the proper approach? Am I learning to use JQuery, but I am not obsessed about using $(this). I am in the learning curve. –  JVerstry Oct 16 '11 at 17:11
    
+1 I was pleasantly surprised when I saw you used elm.id and weren't promoting $(elm).attr("id") or $(elm).prop("id"). Stack Overflow is riddled with enough answers like that. –  Andy E Oct 16 '11 at 17:16
    
Why do you need to use an object at all just to retrieve simple properties? KISS!! –  Sinthia V Oct 16 '11 at 17:27

Yes indeed, the variable this refers to the target element of an event handler. I think you are over complicating it, however. Try

var retr = this.id;

to obtain your id. KISS!!

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I think the issue is that this was not the element creating the event when defining the event handler with a string in your HTML. Also this.id is better than this.getAttribute('id'). –  jfriend00 Oct 16 '11 at 17:33
    
Using pimvdb's $("#logout").click(loadXMLDoc2) in document-ready and your var retr = this.id; in my method, I don't need to add a parameter to it. And it works! –  JVerstry Oct 16 '11 at 18:00
    
The DOM is complicated, but not that bad. Good luck! –  Sinthia V Oct 17 '11 at 10:30

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