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I would like to draw histogram using matplotlib. However, due to the huge data(a list containing about 100,000 numbers) I sent to the hist() function, error will arise when draw two figures. But it goes smoothly while only drawing either of the two plots. Could anyone help me to deal with this? Thanks in advance.

Here is the simplified code to show the error:

f_120 = plt.figure(1)
plt.hist(taccept_list, bins=6000000, normed = True, histtype ="step", cumulative = True, color = 'b', label = 'accepted answer')
plt.hist(tfirst_list, bins=6000000, normed = True, histtype ="step", cumulative = True, color = 'g',label = 'first answer')
plt.axvline(x = 30, ymin = 0, ymax = 1, color = 'r', linestyle = '--', label = '30 min')
plt.axvline(x = 60, ymin = 0, ymax = 1, color = 'c', linestyle = '--', label = '1 hour')
plt.legend()

plt.ylabel('Percentage of answered questions')
plt.xlabel('Minutes elapsed after questions are posted')
plt.title('Cumulative histogram: time elapsed \n before questions receive answer (first 2 hrs)')
plt.ylim(0,1)
plt.xlim(0,120)
f_120.show()
f_120.savefig('7month_0_120.png', format = 'png' )
plt.close()

f_2640 = plt.figure(2)
plt.hist(taccept_list, bins=6000000, normed = True, histtype ="step", cumulative = True, color = 'b', label = 'accepted answer')
plt.hist(tfirst_list, bins=6000000, normed = True, histtype ="step", cumulative = True, color = 'g',label = 'first answer')
plt.axvline(x = 240, ymin = 0, ymax = 1, color = 'r', linestyle = '--', label = '4 hours')
plt.axvline(x = 1440, ymin = 0, ymax = 1, color = 'c', linestyle = '--', label = '1 day')
plt.legend(loc= 4)

plt.ylabel('Percentage of answered questions')
plt.xlabel('Minutes elapsed after questions are posted')
plt.title('Cumulative histogram: time elapsed \n before questions receive answer (first 48)')
plt.ylim(0,1)
plt.xlim(0,2640)
f_2640.show()
f_2640.savefig('7month_0_2640.png', format = 'png' )

The following is the error detail:

plt.hist(tfirst_list, bins=6000000, normed = True, histtype ="step", cumulative = True, color = 'g',label = 'first answer')

File "C:\software\Python26\lib\site-packages\matplotlib\pyplot.py", line 2160, in hist ret = ax.hist(x, bins, range, normed, weights, cumulative, bottom, histtype, align, orientation, rwidth, log, color, label, **kwargs)

File "C:\software\Python26\lib\site-packages\matplotlib\axes.py", line 7775, in hist closed=False, edgecolor=c, fill=False) )

File "C:\software\Python26\lib\site-packages\matplotlib\axes.py", line 6384, in fill for poly in self._get_patches_for_fill(*args, **kwargs):

File "C:\software\Python26\lib\site-packages\matplotlib\axes.py", line 317, in _grab_next_args for seg in self._plot_args(remaining, kwargs):

File "C:\software\Python26\lib\site-packages\matplotlib\axes.py", line 304, in _plot_args seg = func(x[:,j%ncx], y[:,j%ncy], kw, kwargs)

File "C:\software\Python26\lib\site-packages\matplotlib\axes.py", line 263, in _makefill (x[:,np.newaxis],y[:,np.newaxis])),

File "C:\software\Python26\lib\site-packages\numpy\core\shape_base.py", line 270, in hstack return _nx.concatenate(map(atleast_1d,tup),1)

MemoryError

share|improve this question
    
Please post the traceback. Umm, and why are you plotting same figure twice? –  Avaris Oct 16 '11 at 17:30
    
Do you really need 6 million bins? I don't see why it shouldn't work anyway, but it's possible matplotlib isn't implemented very efficiently for this case. Even a very high quality print on A4 paper has on the order of only ten thousand columns. What is the resolution of your plot? –  rlibby Oct 16 '11 at 17:39
    
@rlibby I am sorry I am new to matplotlib and I don't know how to get the resolution of my plot. It just shows perfectly for either single plot, but crash down when drawing them together. –  AnneS Oct 16 '11 at 17:46
    
@Avaris Actually I want to use the same data to show two different ranges of the same histogram. And when running this script, the first figure is saved successsfully while when dealing with the second, shows "Memorry error' And I am running again to get the traceback –  AnneS Oct 16 '11 at 17:50
1  
@AnneS, if you don't need to see the plot, you can save it without invoking show(). And you don't need to plot again to adjust parameters xlim, ylim, etc... Just adjust, save, adjust again, save again, ... –  Avaris Oct 16 '11 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As others have noted, six million bins doesn't sound very useful. But a simple thing would be to reuse the same figure: since the only plot elements that change are things other than the histograms, try something like this:

vline1 = plt.axvline(...)
vline2 = plt.axvline(...)
lgd = legend()

and after the savefig don't close the figure and plot new histograms, instead reuse it, changing what needs to be changed:

# change vline1 and vline2 positions and labels
vline1.set_data([240,240],[0,1])
vline1.set_label('new label')
vline2.set_data(...)
vline2.set_label(...)
# remove old legend, replace with new
lgd.remove()
lgd = plt.legend(loc=4)
plt.xlabel('new xlabel')
# etc

Finally call savefig again with the new filename.

share|improve this answer

You plot 6 million bins and then zoom in on (presumably) a small part of that. With two lines per figure, that's 12 million data points and I'm not surprised matplotlib crashes once you try and plot another 12 million in the next figure. I highly doubt you really need six million bins, so let's try and get your histogram down to a more manageable size!

Let's say that your data spans the 44 or 48 hours that you wish to look at. Then with six million bins this would imply you have a 30 millisecond resolution in your data. Considering the resolution of minutes which you display, this seems unreasonable. Alternatively, you have a resolution of seconds, so 6 million bins would imply your data spans 70 days, but you only look at two of them.

Let's assume you are interested in two days of data with a resolution in terms of seconds or minutes.

While you specify bins as a number of bins, you can also specify a range of values. Thus for your first graph, you could say

plt.hist(taccept_list, bins=range(120), normed = True, histtype ="step", cumulative = True, color = 'b', label = 'accepted answer')
plt.hist(tfirst_list, bins=range(120), normed = True, histtype ="step", cumulative = True, color = 'g',label = 'first answer')

giving you a resolution in minutes for the first 120 minutes. The histogram will disregard anything higher than 120 which is fine, since you are not going to show it in your plot anyway.

An alternative for resolution in seconds could be:

numpy.linspace(0,120,7200)

Now, the number of points in your histogram is much more reasonable and probably more in line with the data you are looking at / displaying.

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