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I have a UTF-8 text file example.txt that contains: c:/temp/file.txt

I read the file content using this method:

public static String fileToString(final File file, final String charset) throws AppServerException
    {
        final byte[] buffer = new byte[(int) file.length()];
        FileInputStream fileInputStream = null;
        try
        {
            fileInputStream = new FileInputStream(file);
            fileInputStream.read(buffer);
        }
        catch (final FileNotFoundException e)
        {
            throw new AppServerException(e.getMessage());
        }
        catch (final IOException e)
        {
            throw new AppServerException(e.getMessage());
        }
        finally
        {
            FileHelper.close(fileInputStream);
        }

        try
        {
            return new String(buffer,charset);
        }
        catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e)
        {
                throw new AppServerException(e.getMessage());
        }

    }

Then I want to check if the file c:/temp/file.txt exists:

String content = fileToString("example.txt","UTF8");
File file = new File(content );
System.out.println(file.exists());

The exits() return false but the file actually exists.

If I change the encoding of example.txt to ANSI using notepad++, the exists() return true.

I already tried using: "c:\temp\file.txt", "c:\\temp\\file.txt", "c:\\\\temp\\\\file.txt", but without success.

I really need to use the file as UTF8. Do you have tips so the method exists() returns true?

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2 Answers 2

Notepad++ probably puts a Byte Order Mark in front of the file. This is unnecessary for UTF-8 and Java does not interpret this sequence of three characters.

Either use an editor that does not use a Byte Order Mark or write the string in ANSI if your filename does not contain any non-ASCII characters.

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Notepad++ has indeed a BOM option when selecting UTF-8. However, I am not selecting it :(. The problem is that the file contains other data and needs to be in UTF8... –  Ricardo Oct 16 '11 at 18:43
    
You did not mention "other data" in your question. Could it be the case that the problem actually has something to do with this other data? –  Grodriguez Oct 16 '11 at 18:51

Perhaps the file is not actually encoded as UTF-8. Can you print the actual byte values of the "\" characters in the file?

While you are at it: InputStream.read(byte[] b) is not guaranteed to read b.length bytes from the stream. You should be reading in a loop and checking the return value of the read() method in order to see how many bytes were actually read in each call.

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The file is encoded with UTF-8. Using debug the path is "pretty": "c:/temp/file.txt" -> "c:/temp/file.txt"; "c:\temp\file.txt" -> "c:\\temp\\file.txt". But the exists() method always return false. Also using debug, the actual byte value return for the slash is 92. Its appears to be correct... :( –  Ricardo Oct 16 '11 at 18:00
1  
If you create the File object passing the literal string, instead of reading it from the file, does exist() return true? –  Grodriguez Oct 16 '11 at 18:49
    
Yes, passing the literal the file exists. I made this "hack": new String(content.getBytes(),"ASCII").substring(3);. Converting to ASCII, the first 3 char where "garbage". Doing this, it works... But I believe this is not the best aprroach. However, for now it works. –  Ricardo Oct 16 '11 at 19:13
1  
That certainly looks like a byte order mark. Can you print the value of these first three characters? –  Grodriguez Oct 16 '11 at 20:44

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