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Below is a test of php foreach loop of a big array, I thought that if the $v don't change, the real copy will not happen because of copy on write, but why it is fast when pass by reference?

Code 1:

function test1($a){
  $c = 0;
  foreach($a as $v){ if($v=='xxxxx') ++$c; }
}

function test2(&$a){
  $c = 0;
  foreach($a as $v){ if($v=='xxxxx') ++$c; }
}

$x = array_fill(0, 100000, 'xxxxx');

$begin = microtime(true);
test1($x);
$end1 = microtime(true);
test2($x);
$end2 = microtime(true);

echo $end1 - $begin . "\n";   //0.03320002555847
echo $end2 - $end1;           //0.02147388458252

But this time, using pass by reference is slow.

Code 2:

function test1($a){
  $cnt = count($a); $c = 0;
  for($i=0; $i<$cnt; ++$i)
    if($a[$i]=='xxxxx') ++$c;
}
function test2(&$a){
  $cnt = count($a); $c = 0;
  for($i=0; $i<$cnt; ++$i)
    if($a[$i]=='xxxxx') ++$c;
}
$x = array_fill(0, 100000, 'xxxxx');

$begin = microtime(true);
test1($x);
$end1 = microtime(true);
test2($x);
$end2 = microtime(true);

echo $end1 - $begin . "\n";   //0.024326801300049
echo $end2 - $end1;           //0.037616014480591

Can someone explain why passing by reference is fast in code1 but slow in code2?

Edit: With Code 2, the count($a) makes the main difference, so the time of the loop took is almost the same.

share|improve this question
1  
You're not testing identical code, so why are you assuming that the results should be the same (and why are you attributing the difference to the argument passing method?)? –  Amber Oct 16 '11 at 19:06
    
@Amber I don't assuming the results should be the same, I thought i don't need to use passing by reference because php is using copy on write. –  xdazz Oct 16 '11 at 19:09
    
How much faster/slower ? –  nos Oct 16 '11 at 19:31
    
@nos See my edit. –  xdazz Oct 16 '11 at 19:39
1  
And on Ideone: ideone.com/5g1DH –  Jared Farrish Oct 16 '11 at 20:47
show 11 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I thought that if the $v don't change [foreach($a as $v)], the real copy will not happen because of copy on write, but why it is fast when pass by reference?

The impact is not on $v but on $a, the huge array. You either pass it as value or as reference to the function. Inside the function it's then value (test1) or reference (test2).

You have two codes (code 1 and code 2).

Code 1: Is using foreach. With foreach you've got two options: iterate over a value or a reference (Example). When you iterate over a value, the iteration is done on a copy of the value. If you iterate over a reference, no copy is done.

As you use the reference in test2, it's faster. The values do not need to be copied. But in test1, you pass the array as value, the array gets copied.

Code 2: Is using for. For does nothing actually here. In both cases. You access the variable and read value from the array. That's pretty much the same regardless if it's a reference or a copy (thanks to the copy on write optimization in PHP).

You might now wonder, why there is a difference in code 2. The difference is not because of for but because of count. If you pass a reference to count PHP internally creates a copy of it because it count needs a copy, not a reference.

Read as well: Do not use PHP references by Johannes Schlüter


I've compiled a set of tests as well. But I more specifically put code into the test functions.

  • Blank - What's the difference in calling the function?
  • Count - Does count make a difference?
  • For - What happens with foronly (not count)?
  • Foreach - Just foreach - even breaking on first element.

Every test is in two versions, one called _copy (passing the array as copy into the function) and one called _ref (passing the array as reference).

It's not always that these micro-benchmarks tell you the truth, but if you're able to isolate specific points, you can quite well do an educated guess, for example that not for but count had the impact:

function blank_copy($a){
}
function blank_ref(&$a){
}
function foreach_copy($a){
    foreach($a as $v) break;
}
function foreach_ref(&$a){
    foreach($a as $v) break;
}
function count_copy($a){
  $cnt = count($a);
}
function count_ref(&$a){
  $cnt = count($a);
}
function for_copy($a){
    for($i=0;$i<100000;$i++)
        $a[$i];
}
function for_ref(&$a){
    for($i=0;$i<100000;$i++)
        $a[$i];
}

$tests = array('blank_copy', 'blank_ref', 'foreach_copy', 'foreach_ref', 'count_copy', 'count_ref', 'for_copy', 'for_ref');


$x = array_fill(0, 100000, 'xxxxx');
$count = count($x);
$runs = 10;

ob_start();

for($i=0;$i<10;$i++)
{
    shuffle($tests);
    foreach($tests as $test)
    {
        $begin = microtime(true);
        for($r=0;$r<$runs;$r++)
            $test($x);
        $end = microtime(true);
        $result = $end - $begin;
        printf("* %'.-16s: %f\n", $test, $result);
    }
}

$buffer = explode("\n", ob_get_clean());
sort($buffer);
echo implode("\n", $buffer);

Output:

* blank_copy......: 0.000011
* blank_copy......: 0.000011
* blank_copy......: 0.000012
* blank_copy......: 0.000012
* blank_copy......: 0.000012
* blank_copy......: 0.000015
* blank_copy......: 0.000015
* blank_copy......: 0.000015
* blank_copy......: 0.000015
* blank_copy......: 0.000020
* blank_ref.......: 0.000012
* blank_ref.......: 0.000012
* blank_ref.......: 0.000014
* blank_ref.......: 0.000014
* blank_ref.......: 0.000014
* blank_ref.......: 0.000014
* blank_ref.......: 0.000015
* blank_ref.......: 0.000015
* blank_ref.......: 0.000015
* blank_ref.......: 0.000015
* count_copy......: 0.000020
* count_copy......: 0.000022
* count_copy......: 0.000022
* count_copy......: 0.000023
* count_copy......: 0.000024
* count_copy......: 0.000025
* count_copy......: 0.000025
* count_copy......: 0.000025
* count_copy......: 0.000026
* count_copy......: 0.000031
* count_ref.......: 0.113634
* count_ref.......: 0.114165
* count_ref.......: 0.114390
* count_ref.......: 0.114878
* count_ref.......: 0.114923
* count_ref.......: 0.115106
* count_ref.......: 0.116698
* count_ref.......: 0.118077
* count_ref.......: 0.118197
* count_ref.......: 0.123201
* for_copy........: 0.190837
* for_copy........: 0.191883
* for_copy........: 0.193080
* for_copy........: 0.194947
* for_copy........: 0.195045
* for_copy........: 0.195944
* for_copy........: 0.198314
* for_copy........: 0.198878
* for_copy........: 0.200016
* for_copy........: 0.227953
* for_ref.........: 0.191918
* for_ref.........: 0.194227
* for_ref.........: 0.195952
* for_ref.........: 0.196045
* for_ref.........: 0.197392
* for_ref.........: 0.197730
* for_ref.........: 0.201936
* for_ref.........: 0.207102
* for_ref.........: 0.208017
* for_ref.........: 0.217156
* foreach_copy....: 0.111968
* foreach_copy....: 0.113224
* foreach_copy....: 0.113574
* foreach_copy....: 0.113575
* foreach_copy....: 0.113879
* foreach_copy....: 0.113959
* foreach_copy....: 0.114194
* foreach_copy....: 0.114450
* foreach_copy....: 0.114610
* foreach_copy....: 0.118020
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000015
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000016
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000016
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000016
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000018
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000019
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000019
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000019
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000019
* foreach_ref.....: 0.000020
share|improve this answer
    
Good through tests. I wonder if clearing the variables (by setting them to null so their reference counts are 0) or calling the garbage collector directly after each iteration would give more consistent results between each batch? –  Yzmir Ramirez Oct 16 '11 at 21:04
    
Well, don't try to optimize. The main point is that if you use references, you should know what you do. Passing a reference to function that can not handle references will make PHP create a copy so the data in your reference is not tainted in case the function you call changes something. The function operates on the copy then. –  hakre Oct 16 '11 at 21:06
    
@hakre Yep, in code2, count() takes the main difference. But why a copy is created? And my question is mainly about code 1. –  xdazz Oct 16 '11 at 21:06
    
@hakre Just wanted to note that your statement "Copy on write is for variables only, not references" is wrong (at least in the current form). Copy on write can still occur with is_ref=1, but not if you mix a ref var with more than one non-ref var (and only because this is not true in this particular example copy on write doesn't apply). Additionally this doesn't explain why the foreach by ref is faster (I assume this is the main question here, as the other part is fairly straightforward.) –  NikiC Oct 16 '11 at 21:11
    
I missed the foreach part of the question and I know that my wording is not precise. Thanks for the clarifcation. However foreach operates on an array copy as well - as documented. Will edit the answer. –  hakre Oct 16 '11 at 21:12
show 8 more comments

Actually, I disagree a bit with the first answer. Most importantly, as the comments say, the tests are not the same. Here's the fully-isolated tests, testing ONLY the loops.

Version 1:

<?php
function test1($a) {
    $c = 0;
    $begin = microtime(true);
    foreach ($a as $v) {
        if ($v == 'x') ++$c;
    }
    $end = microtime(true);
    echo $end - $begin . "\n";
    return $c;
}

function test2(&$a) {
    $c = 0;
    $begin = microtime(true);
    foreach ($a as $v) {
        if ($v == 'x') ++$c;
    }
    $end = microtime(true);
    echo $end - $begin . "\n";
    return $c;
}

$x = array_fill(0, 1000000, 'x');

test1($x); // 0.11617302894592
test2($x); // 0.059789180755615

Version 2:

<?php
function test1($a) {
    $cnt = count($a);
    $c = 0;
    $begin = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $cnt; ++$i) if ($a[$i] == 'x') ++$c;
    $end = microtime(true);
    echo $end - $begin . "\n";
    return $c;
}

function test2(&$a) {
    $cnt = count($a);
    $c = 0;
    $begin = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $cnt; ++$i) if ($a[$i] == 'x') ++$c;
    $end = microtime(true);
    echo $end - $begin . "\n";
    return $c;
}

$x = array_fill(0, 1000000, 'x');

test1($x); // 0.086347818374634
test2($x); // 0.086491107940674

Notice that in the fully-isolated form, the second tests show NO differences, while the first one does. Why?

The answer is that the array has an internal pointer for things like foreach. It can be accessed by calls like current. When you do foreach with a reference, the original array's pointers is used. When you pass by value, the array internals must be copied as soon as the foreach executes, even if the values are maintained somehow by the engine. Thus, the penalty.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to have a source-code or other authoritative reference on the "When you pass by value, the array internals must be copied as soon as the foreach executes" part. Afaik foreach will just reset the array pointer. –  NikiC Oct 16 '11 at 21:13
    
Good point about creating two separate tests. Seems the first test was in fact interferring with the results of the second ... Heisenberg anyone? –  Yzmir Ramirez Oct 16 '11 at 21:16
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