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For example, I'm asking whether or not a person wants an ice-cream. If they say yes, (or input 1) I want it to ask the next question, "Which flavour would you like?", but if they say no, I want it to skip the next question all together and go onto whatever question is after that one that was voided, such as "Do you like toast?"

I tried using if statements, but didn't have that much luck.

I basically wrote:

if (answer == 1) {
    System.out.print("Which flavour would you like?");
    flavour = keyboard.nextLine;
}
else {}

But the compiler gets annoyed because I use the value flavour further down in the code and it seems like because it's in an if statement the program is having difficulty accessing it. (Because further down in the code I ask questions based on which ice cream flavour the person chose.

Thanks greatly.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that flavour is not set to anything if the answer is not 1. What do you expect it to do?

To fix this, you need to value flavour a value either before the if or in the else block. You may need to check this later to see if its sensible.

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1  
Thank you, that worked. –  Doug Smith Oct 16 '11 at 23:25

Well, you'll need to declare that flavour has a value, e.g. null:

String flavour = null;
if (answer == 1) {
    ...
}

Otherwise if you try to read from flavour, the compiler can't be sure that you have given it a value.

However, ideally you should try to design your code so that it's clear that you won't use the variable unless it's been given a useful value. You say you use the variable later on in your code - are you making sure that you're only using it if you actually asked the question? Could you just use the value immediately after you've asked for it? While giving a "dummy" value like null will stop the compiler from whinging, it's better if you can structure your code so that you don't need the dummy value in the first place.

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If you declare and intialize flavour outside the if statement you should be fine.

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