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I have a bunch of tests written using pytest. There are all under a directory 'dir'..for example

dir/test_base.py
dir/test_something.py
dir/test_something2.py

....

The simplified version of code in them is as follows:

test_base.py

import pytest

class TestBase:
   def setup_module(module):
      assert False

   def teardown_module(module):
      assert False

test_something.py

import pytest
from test_base import TestBase

class TestSomething(TestBase):
   def test_dummy():
       pass

test_something2.py

import pytest
from test_base import TestBase

class TestSomethingElse(TestBase):
   def test_dummy2():
       pass

All my test_something*.py files extend the base class in test_base.py. Now I wrote setup_module(module) and setup_teardown(module) methods in test_base.py. I was expecting the setup_module to be called once for all tests, and teardown_module() to be called at the end, once all tests are finished.

But the functions dont' seem to be getting called? Do I need some decorators for this to work?

share|improve this question

Put setup_module and teardown_module outside of a class on module level. Then add your class with your tests.

def setup_module(module):
    """..."""

def teardown_module(module):
    """..."""

class TestSomething:

    def test_dummy(self):
        """do some tests"""

For more info refer to this article.

share|improve this answer

The OP's requirement was for setup and teardown each to execute only once, not one time per module. This can be accomplished with a combination of a conftest.py file, @pytest.fixture(scope="session") and passing the fixture name to each test function.

These are described in the Pytest fixtures documentation

Here's an example:

conftest.py

import pytest

@pytest.fixture(scope="session")
    def my_setup(request):
        print '\nDoing setup'
        def fin():
            print ("\nDoing teardown")
        request.addfinalizer(fin)

test_something.py

def test_dummy(my_setup):
    print '\ntest_dummy'

test_something2.py

def test_dummy2(my_setup):
    print '\ntest_dummy2'

def test_dummy3(my_setup):
    print '\ntest_dummy3'

The output when you run py.test -s:

collected 3 items 

test_something.py 
Doing setup

test_dummy
.
test_something2.py 
test_dummy2
.
test_dummy3
.
Doing teardown

The name conftest.py matters: you can't give this file a different name and expect Pytest to find it as a source of fixtures.

Setting scope="session" is important. Otherwise setup and teardown will be repeated for each test module.

If you'd prefer not to pass the fixture name my_setup as an argument ti eacg test function, you can place test functions inside a class and apply the pytest.mark.usefixtures* decorator to the class.

share|improve this answer

First of all it is a good practice to put all tests in a module called "tests":

<product>
   ...
   tests/
      __init__.py
      test_something.py

Secondly I think you should use setup_class/teardown_class methods in your base class:

import unittest
class MyBase(unittest.TestCase):

   @classmethod
   def setup_class(cls):
       ...

   @classmethod
   def teardown_class(cls):
       ...

More info: http://pytest.org/latest/xunit_setup.html

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a reason this answer doesn't address specifically his trouble using the document-defined Module level setup/teardown. Are you suggesting the setup_module(module) / teardown_module(module) functions do not work as documented? – jdi Oct 16 '11 at 20:29
    
If you think to have a better answer, just give your answer and let others decide if your it's better. – Giacomo Spettoli Oct 16 '11 at 21:04
2  
I'm not saying I have a better answer. Im just asking if you are implying that those documented methods do not work, as suggested by your answer to do it in the init instead. Thats all. Because even in your link, you reference to the doc that explains to use those methods, which are broken for the OP – jdi Oct 16 '11 at 22:06
    
Hi @GiacomoSpettoli thanks for your reply. I am actually looking for getting setup_module/teardown_module to work, instead of setup_class/teardown_class. Because, I want these to be invoked only once for all tests. setup_class/teardown_class will be called for each of my tests that derive my base class. HTH – vinodkone Oct 18 '11 at 18:43
1  
I see...so you should try to put those methods in the __ init __.py. That was my first answer but I changed it because, without your last constraint, the use of class methods looked cleaner. – Giacomo Spettoli Oct 18 '11 at 19:03

setup_module/teardown_module are called for the module where the eventual (derived) tests are defined. This also allows to customize the setup. If you only ever have one setup_module you can put it to test_base.py and import it from the other places. HTH.

share|improve this answer
    
i edited my qsn about to show my code. Is this what you mean? because, that doesn't work... – vinodkone Oct 18 '11 at 18:55
    
setup_module needs to be defined at module level, not class level. – hpk42 Oct 22 '11 at 6:20
    
hi @hpk42 what does that mean exactly? sorry, i'm a python noob. – vinodkone Oct 24 '11 at 5:48
    
"module-level" means at indentation level 0 in your file (same level where you define the class). You currently define setup_module within the class definition. – hpk42 Oct 24 '11 at 18:59
1  
tried that..but didn't work! :( – vinodkone Oct 25 '11 at 0:27

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