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I want to store a pointer to an object and a pointer to it's method of known signature. If I know the class then this pointer have type:

int (MyClass::*pt2Member)(float, char, char)

But how can i store the pointer if i don't know the type?

I want to do something like this:

myObject.callThisFuncLater(&otherObject, &otherObject::method)

How can i store a pointer to method method in myObject and call it later ?

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1  
Six billion duplicates. –  Puppy Oct 16 '11 at 19:52
1  
@DeadMG: show them :) my counter is stuck at 2,178,933 total questions –  sehe Oct 16 '11 at 19:53
    
What arguments will you use when you call it later? –  Beta Oct 16 '11 at 20:10
    
@Beta: does it matter? 3.5f, 'a', 'b' for example –  Andrew Oct 16 '11 at 20:12
    
That will work if the argument list is (float, char, char), but it might be something different at run-time. Even if you store the signature, how will the calling code know what values to pass? To put it another way, how do you intend to use this? –  Beta Oct 16 '11 at 20:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use boost::function (and boost::bind) to store a piece of code to be called later.

class MyClass
{
public:
    void callThisFuncLater( boost::function< int (float, char, char) > callBack );
};
...
myObject.callThisFuncLater( boost::bind( &otherObject::method, &otherObject ) );
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1  
I could be wrong, but should &otherObject and &otherObject::method be switched? –  Vortico Oct 24 '12 at 20:32
    
@Vortico You're right, I'm sorry. I'm going to edit my post to correct it. –  Daniele Oct 25 '12 at 6:16

The easiest way to do it if you have access to the TR1 STL library extensions (available on gcc and Visual Studio 2008 and onwards is. std::function and std::bind can be used to wrap an invocation which can be called later. This functionality is also available in boost function and boost bind:

#include <functional>

class MyClass {
public:
  template<typename T> callThisFuncLater(T& otherObject,
                                         int(T::*)(float, char, char) method) {
    return storedInvocation_ = std::bind(otherObject, 
                                  method, 
                                  std::placeholders::_1,   // float
                                  std::placeholders::_2,   // char
                                  std::placeholders::_3);  // char
  }

  int callStoredInvocation(float a, char b, char c) {
    storedInvocation_(a, b, c);
  }

private:
  std::function<int(float, char, char)> storedInvocation_;
};
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There is no simple way of doing this as originally built into the language or standard library (although, it has recently been added). If you're familiar with Boost, they include a solution for this - Boost.Function.

If for some reason, however, you're unable or unwilling to use Boost, there is a generic way of doing this using templates (which, admittedly, is rather similar to Boost's solution):

class FncPtr
{
public:
    virtual int call(float, char, char) = 0;
};

template <typename T>
class ClassFncPtr : public FncPtr
{
     int (T::*pt2Member)(float, char, char);
     T *inst;
public:
     ClassFncPtr(T* who, int (T::*memfunc)(float,char,char))
         : inst(who), pt2Member(memfunc)
     {
     }
     int call(float a, char b, char c)
     {
         return (inst->*pt2Member)(a,b,c);
     }
};

template <typename T>
FncPtr * makeFuncPointer(T* who, int (T::*memfunc)(float,char,char))
{
    return new ClassFncPtr<T>(who,memfunc);
}

You can also subclass FncPtr to be able to use non-class functions, if you'd like.

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Personally I would choose a different design. Simply because member function pointers in C++ are not easy to work with. Personally I would choose to use interfaces and inherit from these and parse along these.

One of the problems with member function pointers is that they are implemented differently on different compilers. If you use the Borland/Embarcardero compilers and want to limit yourself to this, you can use the __closure keyword, however most likely you are not, and therefore you would have to either use some other compiler specific implementation, or use one of the boost helper classes like function.

But if you are in a situation where you find it helpful to use member function pointers in C++, reconsider your design.

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The standard alternative to closures is lambda functions, but that's still not a realistic replacement for member functions. –  MSalters Oct 17 '11 at 9:05

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