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I'd like to do two things on my progress bar.

  1. Change the green colour to red.
  2. Remove the blocks and make it in one color.

Any information about those two things I wonder how to accomplish will be greatfuly appreaciated!

Thanks.

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18 Answers 18

up vote 25 down vote accepted

In the designer, you just need to set the ForeColor property to whatever color you'd like. In the case of Red, there's a predefined color for it.

To do it in code (C#) do this:

pgs.ForeColor = Color.Red;

Edit: Oh yeah, also set the Style to continuous. In code, like this:

pgs.Style = System.Windows.Forms.ProgressBarStyle.Continuous;

Another Edit: You'll also need to remove the line that reads Application.EnableVisualStyles() from your Program.cs (or similar). If you can't do this because you want the rest of the application to have visual styles, then I'd suggest painting the control yourself or moving on to WPF since this kind of thing is easy with WPF. You can find a tutorial on owner drawing a progress bar on codeplex

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No,its still green. –  ГошУ Apr 22 '09 at 19:08
    
Updated with missing info. –  dustyburwell Apr 22 '09 at 19:12
2  
Forecolor=red ; Backcolor=blue; Style = Continious. Nothing changed,its staying like i never touched it –  ГошУ Apr 22 '09 at 19:15
2  
bah...okay, I see the problem. You need to disable visual styles in order for this to work with the properties. It's probably painting using whatever theme you have selected. In Program.cs there's a line that reads Application.EnableVisualStyles(). Remove that line and this will work. Otherwise, you'll need to paint the control yourself. The other option is to use WPF (if it's a possibility), since it lets you do this kind of stuff really easily. –  dustyburwell Apr 22 '09 at 19:20
1  
Here's a tutorial on owner drawing a progress bar. The process is much too complicated for a comment. codeproject.com/KB/cpp/VistaProgressBar.aspx –  dustyburwell Apr 22 '09 at 19:32

Since the previous answers don't appear to work in with Visual Styles. You'll probably need to create your own class or extend the progress bar:

public class NewProgressBar : ProgressBar
{
    public NewProgressBar()
    {
        this.SetStyle(ControlStyles.UserPaint, true);
    }

    protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        Rectangle rec = e.ClipRectangle;

        rec.Width = (int)(rec.Width * ((double)Value / Maximum)) - 4;
        if(ProgressBarRenderer.IsSupported)
           ProgressBarRenderer.DrawHorizontalBar(e.Graphics, e.ClipRectangle);
        rec.Height = rec.Height - 4;
        e.Graphics.FillRectangle(Brushes.Red, 2, 2, rec.Width, rec.Height);
    }
}

EDIT: Updated code to make the progress bar use the visual style for the background

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2  
Thanks for this, it was something I could work with in my solution. –  Irwin May 20 '09 at 13:41
    
That's really cool, thanks. It really helped me out on something I'm working on at the moment, though I changed it to repaint the whole control each time instead of just the area specified by e.ClipRectangle. Otherwise, it didn't repaint correctly after only part of the control was invalidated by another window or the edge of the screen. –  Matt Blaine Oct 31 '09 at 3:23
    
@Matt Blaine: Could you please post your modification as an edit to the answer? I believe there will be enough people interested in your complete solution. –  Marek Jan 15 '10 at 11:42
    
@Marek Just noticed your comment. I don't have enough rep to edit the answer, so I posted my own. Thanks. stackoverflow.com/questions/778678/… –  Matt Blaine Mar 23 '10 at 6:43
    
I realize this is old; and I realize this is a nit (because Minimum is almost always zero); but the Width scale factor should be (((double)Value - (double)Minimum) / ((double)Maximum - (double)Minimum)) to be anal-retentively correct. :) –  Jesse Chisholm Sep 1 at 14:52

OK, it took me a while to read all the answers and links. Here's what I got out of them:

Sample Results

The accepted answer disables visual styles, it does allow you to set the color to anything you want, but the result looks plain:

enter image description here

Using the following method, you can get something like this instead:

enter image description here

How To

First, include this if you haven't: using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

Second, you can either create this new class, or put its code into an existing static non-generic class:

public static class ModifyProgressBarColor
{
    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = false)]
    static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, uint Msg, IntPtr w, IntPtr l);
    public static void SetState(this ProgressBar pBar, int state)
    {
        SendMessage(pBar.Handle, 1040, (IntPtr)state, IntPtr.Zero);
    }
}

Now, to use it, simply call:

ModifyProgressBarColor.SetState(progressBar1, 2);

Note the second parameter in SetState, 1 = normal (green); 2 = error (red); 3 = warning (yellow).

Hope it helps!

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2  
You created an extension method, so the call should be progressBar1.SetState(2); besides from that, Great answer! –  Limo Wan Kenobi Feb 12 at 16:18
    
Great job :D thank you very much –  Carter Nolan Mar 28 at 21:07

This is a flicker-free version of the most accepted code that you can find as answers to this question. All credit to the posters of those fatastic answers. Thanks Dusty, Chris, Matt, and Josh!

Like "Fueled"'s request in one of the comments, I also needed a version that behaved a bit more... professionaly. This code maintains styles as in previous code, but adds an offscreen image render and graphics buffering (and disposes the graphics object properly).

Result: all the good, and no flicker. :)

public class NewProgressBar : ProgressBar
{
    public NewProgressBar()
    {
        this.SetStyle(ControlStyles.UserPaint, true);
    }

    protected override void OnPaintBackground(PaintEventArgs pevent)
    {
        // None... Helps control the flicker.
    }

    protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        const int inset = 2; // A single inset value to control teh sizing of the inner rect.

        using (Image offscreenImage = new Bitmap(this.Width, this.Height))
        {
            using (Graphics offscreen = Graphics.FromImage(offscreenImage))
            {
                Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(0, 0, this.Width, this.Height);

                if (ProgressBarRenderer.IsSupported)
                    ProgressBarRenderer.DrawHorizontalBar(offscreen, rect);

                rect.Inflate(new Size(-inset, -inset)); // Deflate inner rect.
                rect.Width = (int)(rect.Width * ((double)this.Value / this.Maximum));
                if (rect.Width == 0) rect.Width = 1; // Can't draw rec with width of 0.

                LinearGradientBrush brush = new LinearGradientBrush(rect, this.BackColor, this.ForeColor, LinearGradientMode.Vertical);
                offscreen.FillRectangle(brush, inset, inset, rect.Width, rect.Height);

                e.Graphics.DrawImage(offscreenImage, 0, 0);
                offscreenImage.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
}
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2  
should be the accepted answer :) Ty! –  Nico Oct 1 '12 at 16:38
    
Well this is the closest to original implemantation from Microsoft. –  Yakup Ünyılmaz Jan 11 '13 at 16:25
1  
Having a using block and calling Dispose is actually a bit redundant. Great answer though. –  Kevin Stricker Jun 19 at 23:14
    
I realize this is old; and I realize this is a nit (because Minimum is almost always zero); but the Width scale factor should be (((double)Value - (double)Minimum) / ((double)Maximum - (double)Minimum)) to be anal-retentively correct. :) –  Jesse Chisholm Sep 1 at 14:52

Modificaton to dustyburwell's answer. (I don't have enough rep to edit it myself.) Like his answer, it works with "Visual Styles" enabled. You can just set the progressbar's ForeColor property in whatever form's design view.

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Drawing;

public class ProgressBarEx : ProgressBar
{
    private SolidBrush brush = null;

    public ProgressBarEx()
    {
        this.SetStyle(ControlStyles.UserPaint, true);
    }

    protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        if (brush == null || brush.Color != this.ForeColor)
            brush = new SolidBrush(this.ForeColor);

        Rectangle rec = new Rectangle(0, 0, this.Width, this.Height);
        if (ProgressBarRenderer.IsSupported)
            ProgressBarRenderer.DrawHorizontalBar(e.Graphics, rec);
        rec.Width = (int)(rec.Width * ((double)Value / Maximum)) - 4;
        rec.Height = rec.Height - 4;
        e.Graphics.FillRectangle(brush, 2, 2, rec.Width, rec.Height);
    }
}
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This is a great answer, worked well for me. –  Kin May 3 '10 at 17:51
    
This works great for changing the foreground color, but it flickers a lot, whereas the default ProgressBar control does not. Any idea how to solve this? –  Fueled Dec 22 '10 at 9:28
3  
I've found out how to solve the flickering: add double-buffering to the ControlStyles of the user-defined ProgressBar, like this: SetStyle(ControlStyles.UserPaint | ControlStyles.OptimizedDoubleBuffer, ...). –  Fueled Dec 22 '10 at 10:17
    
I realize this is old; and I realize this is a nit (because Minimum is almost always zero); but the Width scale factor should be (((double)Value - (double)Minimum) / ((double)Maximum - (double)Minimum)) to be anal-retentively correct. :) –  Jesse Chisholm Sep 1 at 14:53

Using Matt Blaine and Chris Persichetti's answers I've created a progress bar that looks a bit nicer while allowing infinite color choice (basically I changed one line in Matt's solution):

ProgressBarEx:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Drawing.Drawing2D;

namespace QuantumConcepts.Common.Forms.UI.Controls
{
    public class ProgressBarEx : ProgressBar
    {
        public ProgressBarEx()
        {
            this.SetStyle(ControlStyles.UserPaint, true);
        }

        protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
        {
            LinearGradientBrush brush = null;
            Rectangle rec = new Rectangle(0, 0, this.Width, this.Height);
            double scaleFactor = (((double)Value - (double)Minimum) / ((double)Maximum - (double)Minimum));

            if (ProgressBarRenderer.IsSupported)
                ProgressBarRenderer.DrawHorizontalBar(e.Graphics, rec);

            rec.Width = (int)((rec.Width * scaleFactor) - 4);
            rec.Height -= 4;
            brush = new LinearGradientBrush(rec, this.ForeColor, this.BackColor, LinearGradientMode.Vertical);
            e.Graphics.FillRectangle(brush, 2, 2, rec.Width, rec.Height);
        }
    }
}

Usage:

progressBar.ForeColor = Color.FromArgb(255, 0, 0);
progressBar.BackColor = Color.FromArgb(150, 0, 0);

Results

You can use any gradient you like!

Download

https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=0EDE5D21BDC5F270&id=EDE5D21BDC5F270%21160&sc=documents#

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1  
I realize this is old; and I realize this is a nit (because Minimum is almost always zero); but the Width scale factor should be (((double)Value - (double)Minimum) / ((double)Maximum - (double)Minimum)) to be anal-retentively correct. :) –  Jesse Chisholm Sep 1 at 14:54
    
Updated the answer w/your suggestion. –  Josh M. Sep 3 at 17:17

Usually the progress bar is either themed or honors the user's color preferences. So for changing the color you either need to turn off visual styles and set ForeColor or draw the control yourself.

As for the continuous style instead of blocks you can set the Style property:

pBar.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Continuous;
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I just put this into a static class.

  const int WM_USER = 0x400;
  const int PBM_SETSTATE = WM_USER + 16;
  const int PBM_GETSTATE = WM_USER + 17;

  [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, SetLastError = false)]
  static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, uint Msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

  public enum ProgressBarStateEnum : int
  {
   Normal = 1,
   Error = 2,
   Paused = 3,
  }

  public static ProgressBarStateEnum GetState(this ProgressBar pBar)
  {
   return (ProgressBarStateEnum)(int)SendMessage(pBar.Handle, PBM_GETSTATE, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero);
  }

  public static void SetState(this ProgressBar pBar, ProgressBarStateEnum state)
  {
   SendMessage(pBar.Handle, PBM_SETSTATE, (IntPtr)state, IntPtr.Zero);
  } 

Hope it helps,

Marc

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+1: I think this is what most people meant by red. Making it show an error state. –  xiaomao Jan 30 '13 at 1:07

EDIT

By the sounds of things you're using the XP Theme which has the green block based prog-bar. Try flipping your UI Style to Windows Classic and test again, but you may need to implement your own OnPaint event to get it to do what you want across all UI Styles

Or as someone else pointed out, disable the VisualStyles for your application.

Original

As far as I know, the rendering of the Progress bar happens inline with the windows theme style that you've chosen (win2K, xp, vista)

You can change the color by setting the property

ProgressBar.ForeColor

I'm not sure that you can do much more however...

does some googling

Theres an article here from MS KB on creating a "Smooth" progress bar

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323116

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@Eion,Forecolor=red ; Backcolor=blue; Style = Continious. Nothing changed,its staying like i never touched it. –  ГошУ Apr 22 '09 at 19:12

I suggest you to take also a look to this article on CodeProject: Progress-O-Doom. It's great!

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Just in case anyone looks for another option.... you can extend a Panel, use it as background (white or whatever), add another Panel inside it for the foreground (the moving bar). Then you have total control changing the color, etc.

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Simply right click on your project in Visual Basic Solution Explorer (where your vb files are) and select properties from the menu. In the window that pops up deselect "Enable XP Visual Styles" and now when you set forecolor, it should work now.

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try using messsage PBM_SETBARCOLOR, that should do the trick with SendMessage

See http://www.vbforums.com/showthread.php?t=248721 for an example.

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Јοеу: Quote: Usually the progress bar is either themed or honors the user's color preferences. So for changing the color you either need to turn off visual styles and set ForeColor or draw the control yourself.

As for the continuous style instead of blocks you can set the Style property:

pBar.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Continuous;

ProgressBarStyle.Continuous versus Blocks is useless with VistualStyles enabled...

Block(s) will only work with visual styles disabled ... which renders all of this a moot point (with regards to custom progress color) With vistual styles disabled ... the progress bar should be colored based on the forecolor.

I used a combination of William Daniel's answer (with visual styles enabled, so the ForeColor will not just be flat with no style) and Barry's answer (to custom text on the progress bar) from: How do I put text on ProgressBar?

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Vertical Bar UP For Down in red color :

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Drawing;



public class VerticalProgressBar : ProgressBar
{


    protected override CreateParams CreateParams
    {
        get
        {
            CreateParams cp = base.CreateParams;
            cp.Style |= 0x04;
            return cp;

        }
    }
    private SolidBrush brush = null;

    public VerticalProgressBar()
    {
        this.SetStyle(ControlStyles.UserPaint, true);
    }

    protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        if (brush == null || brush.Color != this.ForeColor)
            brush = new SolidBrush(this.ForeColor);

        Rectangle rec = new Rectangle(0, 0, this.Width, this.Height);
        if (ProgressBarRenderer.IsSupported)
        ProgressBarRenderer.DrawVerticalBar(e.Graphics, rec);
        rec.Height = (int)(rec.Height * ((double)Value / Maximum)) - 4;
        rec.Width = rec.Width - 4;
        e.Graphics.FillRectangle(brush, 2, 2, rec.Width, rec.Height);

    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please explain either in text or in comments to the code how this solves the problem. –  Harrison Oct 10 '13 at 21:07
    
I realize this is a nit (because Minimum is almost always zero); but the Height scale factor should be (((double)Value - (double)Minimum) / ((double)Maximum - (double)Minimum)) to be anal-retentively correct. :) –  Jesse Chisholm Sep 1 at 14:57

The VB.Net colored progressbar which respects WXP Visual Styles answer is ...

I started with the answer from 'user1032613' on 3/17/12. Note that this is now a Module, not a class. From there I converted the code but more was needed. In particular the converted code showed a DirectCast function to convert the 'state' integer to a IntPtr type which didn't work.

Imports System.Runtime.InteropServices

Public Module ModifyProgressBarColor

    Private Declare Function SendMessage Lib "User32" Alias "SendMessageA" (ByVal hWnd As Long, ByVal wMsg As Long, ByVal wParam As Long, lParam As Long) As Long

    <DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet:=CharSet.Auto, SetLastError:=False)> _
    Private Function SendMessage(hWnd As IntPtr, Msg As UInteger, w As IntPtr, l As IntPtr) As IntPtr
    End Function

    <System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Extension()> _
    Public Sub SetState(pBar As ProgressBar, state As Integer)

        '-- Convert state as integer to type IntPtr
        Dim s As IntPtr
        Dim y As Integer = state
        s = IntPtr.op_Explicit(y)

        '-- Modify bar color
        SendMessage(pBar.Handle, 1040, s, IntPtr.Zero)

    End Sub

End Module

And again just call this in the using code with this line:

Call ModifyProgressBarColor.SetState(prb, 2)

BTW - I tried other colors - 0, 4, 5 - they all just displayed green.

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Simply set the color property.

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2  
I did,its staying green. –  ГошУ Apr 22 '09 at 19:09

Edit: in the two minuites it took me to fire up vs and check the syntax i was beaten to it with much better responses. i love this site.

        progressBar1 = new ProgressBar();
        progressBar1.ForeColor = Color.Red;
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2  
Doesn't work.It stays empty now,i added progressBar1.value = 50,but still empty –  ГошУ Apr 22 '09 at 19:19
    
tried setting the maxiumum value ? progressBar1 = new ProgressBar(); progressBar1.ForeColor = Color.Red; progressBar1.Maximum = 100; –  Fusspawn Apr 22 '09 at 19:23
2  
No,the problem is in my windows theme. –  ГошУ Apr 22 '09 at 19:27
    
No idea if this will work, but try commenting out Application.EnableVisualThemes(); that is in one of the prebuilt files vs generate's ( I cant recall what one ) –  Fusspawn Apr 22 '09 at 19:38
1  
Application.EnableVisualStyles() sorry not themes –  Fusspawn Apr 22 '09 at 19:38

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