Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to save a string in SQL such that each time it is called, part of the string is a variable. For example, if the string is "Hello my name is $name", I want to save it such that whenever it is retrieved, $name is still a variable:

$name = "Doug";
$row = mysql_fetch_array($mysql_query_result);

$message = $row['message'];  // "Hello, my name is $name."

echo $message;  // "Hello, my name is Doug."

One way would be:

str_replace('$name', $name, $message);  // called before echo

I've never been too comfortable with variable variables, but from what I understand, a general function for the str_replace method could be made using them.

My question is whether or not this is necessary? Is there a much easier way to store a variable in SQL and keep it variable?

share|improve this question
    
Storing a literal $var is not a problem. Did you just forget to use single quotes to not get it interpolated prior insertion? Or is your question really about how to make the str_replace work? –  mario Oct 16 '11 at 20:23
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could make it a format string for sprintf.

$name = "Doug";
$row = mysql_fetch_array($mysql_query_result);

$message = sprintf($row['message'], $name);  // "Hello, my name is %s."

echo $message;  // "Hello, my name is Doug."

Or str_replace as you said.

share|improve this answer
1  
This approach is, to me, cleaner and more readily understood than using str_replace. It's also more flexible, and less error prone. –  RonLugge Oct 16 '11 at 21:43
add comment

You could use eval() but I strongly suggest to not use it. Instead use a placeholder in your string and replace it when outputing, e.g. using sprintf() or str_replace() as you suggest.

share|improve this answer
    
Eval does not make sense unless the string was stored as expression, that is '"Hello, my name is " . $name' –  mario Oct 16 '11 at 20:21
    
That's not true as you can, for example, echo "Hello $world";, too. –  str Oct 16 '11 at 20:24
    
Which is a double quoted string expression, not literal text as received from the database. –  mario Oct 16 '11 at 20:26
    
eval() does "evaluate string as PHP code" and you can change the db result in any way you want it. For example see the example in ch2.php.net/eval . –  str Oct 16 '11 at 20:30
1  
addslashes() should avoid this problem. But anyway, it is not a good solution and as such should be avoided entirely. –  str Oct 16 '11 at 20:36
show 1 more comment

You could also do it at the query level using replace():

//part of the query
$query .= "SELECT replace('message','\$name','{$name}')";
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.