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It says here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.stream.read.aspx that the Stream.Read and Stream.Write methods both advance the position/offset in the stream automatically so why is the examples here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.stream.read.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.filestream.read.aspx manually changing the offset?

Do you only set the offset in a loop if you know the size of the stream and set it to 0 if you don't know the size and using a buffer?

   // Now read s into a byte buffer.
    byte[] bytes = new byte[s.Length];
    int numBytesToRead = (int) s.Length;
    int numBytesRead = 0;
    while (numBytesToRead > 0)
    {
        // Read may return anything from 0 to 10.
        int n = s.Read(bytes, numBytesRead, 10);
        // The end of the file is reached.
        if (n == 0)
        {
            break;
        }
        numBytesRead += n;
        numBytesToRead -= n;
    }

and

using (GZipStream stream = new GZipStream(new MemoryStream(gzip), CompressionMode.Decompress))
{
    const int size = 4096;
    byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
    using (MemoryStream memory = new MemoryStream())
    {
    int count = 0;
    do
    {
        count = stream.Read(buffer, 0, size);
        if (count > 0)
        {
        memory.Write(buffer, 0, count);
        }
    }
    while (count > 0);
    return memory.ToArray();
    }
}
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​.​.​.​ ​What​? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 16 '11 at 21:40
    
There's a difference between the internal offsets in a Stream, and the offsets/lengths you need to care about when you read/write data between a buffer and a stream, and perhaps a 2. stream. – nos Oct 16 '11 at 21:44
    
@sehe: Blame your OS. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 16 '11 at 21:45
    
@nos: 2. is a Germanism: English (in fact other languages as well) speakers don't see that it means 'second'. Use 2nd or second instead – sehe Oct 16 '11 at 21:45
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams: so now Opera is my OS - LOL. Chrome/FF does render it ok on the same system. (Also: I blame you for trying to circumvent the minimum length policy on comments by tricking it with &zwsp; -es) – sehe Oct 16 '11 at 21:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Edit (to the edited question):

In none of the code snippets you pasted into the question I see any stream offset being set.

I think you are mistaking the calculation of bytes to read vs. bytes received. This protocol may seem funny (why would you receive fewer bytes than requested?) but it makes sense when you consider that you might be reading from a high-latency packet oriented source (think: network sockets).

You might be receiving 6 characters in one burst (from a TCP packet) and only receive the remaining 4 characters in your next read (when the next packet has arrived).

Edit In response to your linked example from the comment:

using (GZipStream stream = new GZipStream(new MemoryStream(gzip), CompressionMode.Decompress))
    { 
       // ... snip

        count = stream.Read(buffer, 0, size);
        if (count > 0)
        {
        memory.Write(buffer, 0, count);
        }

It appears that the coders use prior knowledge about the underlying stream implementation, that stream.Read will always return 0 OR the size requested. That seems like a risky bet, to me. But if the docs for GZipStream do state that, it could be alright. However, since the MSDN samples use a generic Stream variable, it is (way) more correct to check the exact number of bytes read.


The first linked example uses a MemoryStream in both Write and Read fashion. The position is reset in between, so the data that was written first will be read:

    Stream s = new MemoryStream();
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        s.WriteByte((byte)i);
    }
    s.Position = 0;

The second example linked does not set the stream position. You'd typically have seen a call to Seek if it did. You maybe confusing the offsets into the data buffer with the stream position?

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1  
I'm not talking about the write part, I mean the read part. I was comparing the MS example with dotnetperls.com/decompress – Jonas Oct 16 '11 at 21:55
1  
@Jonas: and I address the GZipStream sample too, now – sehe Oct 16 '11 at 22:10
    
Oh I see, s.Read(bytes, numBytesRead, 10); is actually the offset for the byte buffer? So numBytesRead is setting the position within the buffer, not the stream. – Jonas Oct 16 '11 at 22:21

The offset is actually the offset of the buffer, not the stream. Streams are advanced automatically as they are read.

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