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In Type member support in LINQ-to-Entities? I was attempting to declare a class property to be queried in LINQ which ran into some issues. Here I will lay out the code inside the implementation in hopes of some help for converting it to a query.

I have a class Quiz which contains a collection of Questions, each of which is classified according to a QuestionLevel... I need to determine whether a quiz is "open" or "closed", which is accomplished via an outer join on the question levels and a count of the questions in each level, as compared with a table of maximum values. Here's the code, verbatim:

public partial class Quiz
{
    public bool IsClosed
    {
        get
        {
            // if quiz has no questions, it's open
            if (this.Questions.Count() == 0) return false;

            // get a new handle to the EF container to do a query for max values
            using (EFContainer db = new EFContainer())
            {
                // we get a dictionary of LevelName/number
                Dictionary<string, int> max = db.Registry
                    .Where(x => x.Domain == "Quiz")
                    .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => Convert.ToInt32(x.Value));
                // count the number of questions in each level, comparing to the maxima
                // if any of them are less, the quiz is "open"
                foreach (QuestionLevel ql in db.QuestionLevels)
                {
                    if (this.Questions.Where(x => x.Level == ql).Count() < max["Q:Max:" + ql.Name])
                        return false;
                }
            }
            // the quiz is closed
            return true;
        }
    }
 }

so here's my not-yet-working attempt at it:

    public static IQueryable<Quiz> WhereIsOpen(this IQueryable<Quiz> query)
    {
        EFContainer db = new EFContainer();
        return from ql in db.QuestionLevels
               join q in query on ql equals q.Questions.Select(x => x.Level)
               into qs
               from q in qs.DefaultIfEmpty()
               where q.Questions.Count() < db.Registry
                    .Where(x => x.Domain == "Quiz")
                    .Where(x => x.Key == "Q:Max" + ql.Name)
                    .Select(x => Convert.ToInt32(x.Value))
               select q;
    }

it fails on account on the join, complaining:

The type of one of the expressions in the join clause is incorrect. The type inference failed in the call to 'GroupJoin'

I'm still trying to figure that out.

* update I *

ah. silly me.

   join q in query on ql equals q.Questions.Select(x => x.Level).Single()

one more roadblock:

The specified LINQ expression contains references to queries that are associated with different contexts.

this is because of the new container I create for the maximum lookups; so I thought to re-factor like this:

    public static IQueryable<Quiz> WhereIsOpen(this IQueryable<Quiz> query)
    {
        EFContainer db = new EFContainer();
        IEnumerable<QuestionLevel> QuestionLevels = db.QuestionLevels.ToList();
        Dictionary<string, int> max = db.Registry
                .Where(x => x.Domain == "Quiz")
                .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => Convert.ToInt32(x.Value));
        return from ql in QuestionLevels
               join q in query on ql equals q.Questions.Select(x => x.Level).Single()
               into qs
               from q in qs.DefaultIfEmpty()
               where q.Questions.Count() < max["Q:Max:" + ql.Name]
               select q;
    }

but I can't get the expression to compile... it needs me to cast QuestionLevels to an IQueryable (but casting doesn't work, producing runtime exceptions).

* update II *

I found a solution to the casting problem but now I'm back to the "different contexts" exception. grr...

return from ql in QuestionLevels.AsQueryable()

* update (Kirk's suggestion) *

so I now have this, which compiles but generates a run-time exception:

public static IQueryable<Quiz> WhereIsOpen(this IQueryable<Quiz> query)
{
    EFContainer db = new EFContainer();
    IEnumerable<string> QuestionLevels = db.QuestionLevels.Select(x => x.Name).ToList();
    Dictionary<string, int> max = db.Registry
            .Where(x => x.Domain == "Quiz")
            .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => Convert.ToInt32(x.Value));
    return from ql in QuestionLevels.AsQueryable()
           join q in query on ql equals q.Questions.Select(x => x.Level.Name).Single()
           into qs
           from q in qs.DefaultIfEmpty()
           where q.Questions.Count() < max["Q:Max:" + ql]
           select q;
}

which I then call like this:

List<Product> p = db.Quizes.WhereIsOpen().Select(x => x.Component.Product).ToList();

with the resulting exception:

This method supports the LINQ to Entities infrastructure and is not intended to be used directly from your code.

share|improve this question
    
So what exactly is the problem, and what are you trying to do? Does the current code work? You might want to tidy up this question to more explicitly explain exactly what you're trying to achieve and what the problem you're having is. – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 17 '11 at 0:36
    
@KirkBroadhurst, the problem I have is that I need to do a lookup in the middle of my extension and I can't seem to join the two contexts... – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 0:59
    
@KirkBroadhurst, sorry if it rambles a bit. it's intended to show the many roadblocks I'm hitting. And no, at this point the code doesn't work. the join to QuestionLevels is making it think there are two contexts... but really there shouldn't be because the QuestionLevels should contain in-memory objects... I don't get it. – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 1:09
    
No need to apologise. Just note that both this & your previous contain multiple update sections. When you 'update' you might want to remove any now irrelevant info, and revise the question rather than just throw more info at the bottom. Keeping your focus to a concise, answerable question makes it more useful for future readers. Just remember, this isn't a discussion forum where we chat back & forth - it's Q&A. Ask a question, get an answer. – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 17 '11 at 1:29
    
yeah, I'm used to discussion boards where there is a history left behind for others to review. the problem with removing it is that others may suggest paths already explored... but I get your point. I wish these "comments" were more like the original posting so I could post code here more easily – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 1:40
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The issues you're coming across are common when you couple your database objects to your domain objects. It's for this exact reason that it's good to have a separate set of classes that represent your domain and a separate set of classes that represent your database and are used for database CRUD. Overlap in properties is to be expected, but this approach offers more control of your application and decouples your database from your business logic.

The idea that a quiz is closed belongs to your domain (the business logic). Your DAL (data access layer) should be responsible for joining all the necessary tables so that when you return a Quiz, all the information needed to determine whether or not it's closed is available. Your domain/service/business layer should then create the domain object with the IsClosed property properly populated so that in your UI layer (MVC) you can easily access it.

I see that you're access the database context directly, I'd warn against that and encourage you to look into using DI/IoC framework (Ninject is great), however, I'm going to access the database context directly also

Use this class in your views/controllers:

public class QuizDomainObject 
{
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public bool IsClosed {get; set;}
    // all other properties
}

Controller:

public class QuizController : Controller 
{
    public ActionResult View(int id)
    {
        // using a DI/IoC container is the 
        // preferred method instead of 
        // manually creating a service
        var quizService = new QuizService(); 
        QuizDomainObject quiz = quizService.GetQuiz(id);

        return View(quiz);
    }
}

Service/business layer:

public class QuizService
{
    public QuizDomainObject GetQuiz(int id)
    {
        // using a DI/IoC container is the 
        // preferred method instead of 
        // access the datacontext directly
        using (EFContainer db = new EFContainer())
        {
            Dictionary<string, int> max = db.Registry
                .Where(x => x.Domain == "Quiz")
                .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => Convert.ToInt32(x.Value));

            var quiz = from q in db.Quizes
                       where q.Id equals id
                       select new QuizDomainObject()
                       {
                            Id = q.Id,
                            // all other propeties,

                            // I'm still unclear about the structure of your  
                            // database and how it interlates, you'll need 
                            // to figure out the query correctly here
                            IsClosed =  from q in ....
                       };


            return quiz;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the suggested new approach. this is my first MVC project and the issue of injections is something I've tabled for when I start to put together a test suite. I need to make the app work as soon as possible so testing (I know, it's supposed to be done in parallel) has taken a back seat. I'm sure in my second project I'll do it the right way... – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 0:55
2  
one thing I don't understand: EF is supposed to be my modelling space and how that maps to the back-end database is up to the mapping mechanisms... so why would I want to have a second (DAL) layer? isn't the EF model my DAL? – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 1:06
    
@ekkis That's a great comment. But hey, you can never have too many layers, can you?? – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 17 '11 at 1:15
    
heh. I've ran into others that have made this kind of suggestion but I'm resistant because I'm still under the (probable) delusion that the EF is my DAL – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 1:43
    
@ekkis: I absolutely agree with Omar's approach, though I (and others) talk in another terminology: What he calls QuizDomainObject would I call QuizViewModel (because it is directly used in the View) and the "database object" is the "entity" (=Quiz). But these are only other words for the same thing. You should really forget to create an extension method for your complex code: Creating a second context and mixing it with an IQueryable from another context will be a source of endless trouble. And yes: IsClosed should be method on the DomainObject=ViewModel and not in the entity. – Slauma Oct 17 '11 at 16:35

Re: your comment

The join to QuestionLevels is making it think there are two contexts... but really there shouldn't be because the QuestionLevels should contain in-memory objects

I believe that if you join on simple types rather than objects you'll avoid this problem. The following might work for you:

return from ql in QuestionLevels                
       join q in query 
       on ql.LevelId equals q.Questions.Select(x => x.Level).Single().LevelId
       into qs 

(and if this doesn't work then construct some anonymous types and join on the Id)

The problem is that joining on the Level objects causes EF to do some under-the-covers magic - find the objects in the database and perform a join there. If you tell it to join on a simple type then it should send the values to the database for a SELECT, retrieve the objects and stitch them together back in your application layer.

share|improve this answer
    
I implemented your idea (see latest update - I put it there as I can't paste code into these replies and have it look good) but there's still something it needs... – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 1:30
    
Which method or line is the exception complaining about? – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 17 '11 at 1:36
    
it's complaining when I make the call (List<Product> p = ). I don't know if the stack trace would help. it's here: pastebin.com/V9FyZ1qf – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 1:42
    
See this link. LINQ to Entities Infrastructure. I'd try two tests to narrow this down: List<Product> p = db.Quizes.ToList().WhereIsOpen().Select(x => x.Component.Product).ToList();, and List<Product> p = db.Quizes.Select(x => x.Component.Product).ToList();. – Kirk Broadhurst Oct 17 '11 at 2:05
    
the second query works fine; the first won't compile as it can't find the .WhereIsOpen() method. reading the above link... also found an article that talks a little (see bottom) about this sort of thing but I can't make out that it's helpful: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/ar/adodotnetentityframework/… – ekkis Oct 17 '11 at 2:17

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