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I would like to find the most recently changed file in a directory, excluding hidden files (the ones that start with .) and also excluding directories.

This question is headed in the right direction, but not exactly what I need:

Linux: Most recent file in a directory

The key here is to exclude directories...

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Like the answer there except without -A

ls -rt | tail -n 1

Look at man ls for more info.

To make it exclude directories, we use the -F option to add a "/" to each directory, and then filter for those that don't have the "/":

ls -Frt | grep "[^/]$" | tail -n 1
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ls -rt | tail -n 1 doesn't exclude directories. –  cwd Oct 16 '11 at 22:14
    
Ah okay. Changed appropriately. –  oadams Oct 16 '11 at 22:48
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same one, not very clean but: ls -c1 + tail if you want => ls -c1 | tail -1

$ touch a .b
$ ls -c1
a
$ ls -c1a
a
.b
$ touch d
$ ls -c1
d
a
$ ls -c1a
.
d
a
.b
..
$ touch .b
$ ls -c1a
.b
.
d
a
..

As you can see, without a arg, only visible files are listed.

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it's also showing directories - I'd hoped to exclude those. Am I using your command wrong? –  cwd Oct 16 '11 at 22:16
    
ls -cF1 | grep -Ev '/$' | head -1 ? –  Aif Oct 17 '11 at 8:49
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This does what you want, excluding directories:

stat --printf='%F %Y %n\n' * | sort | grep -v ^directory | head -n 1
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probably the same as the answer in the other post but with a small difference (excluding directories) -

ls --group-directories-first -rt | tail -n 1
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also without a '*' symbol at the end of the filename –  ankith13 Oct 17 '11 at 11:11
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