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What's best...

create variables like this:

var one = 1;
var two = 2;
var three = 3;

or like this:

var myStuff = {}
myStuff.one = 1;
myStuff.two = 2;
myStuff.three = 3;

I've seen both ways and don't understand what the main difference is. Can anyone clarify for me please.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by ircmaxell, Juhana, Ed Cottrell, Ben Flynn, Approaching Darkness Fish Mar 3 at 6:03

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Don't ask what's best. Instead ask: what are (dis)advantages of doing such-and-such way? –  sehe Oct 16 '11 at 22:29
3  
They do entirely different things? –  Esailija Oct 16 '11 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With the first...

  • it adds 3 names to the variable environment
  • the variables can not be directly accessed outside its variable environment

With the second...

  • it creates an object, and assigns it to a single name in the environment
  • the object itself can be passed outside the enclosing environment
  • updates to the object can be observed by whatever code is referencing the object
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1  
As clarification for 'variable environment', you mean 'function scope', since that is the only scope that variables reside in javascript. Since he used var, they will exist in whichever function he declared them in. If he didn't put them inside a function, they will be in the global scope. –  Ryan Oct 16 '11 at 22:39
    
@Ryan: not exactly. Things have changed quite massively with the ES5 specification. Instead of Variable and Activation objects, we now have the suched called Lexcial environments. So he answered the question for ES5, not for ES3. He should point that out probably. –  jAndy Oct 16 '11 at 22:44
    
Lexical scope is not implemented, yet ;) But, you're right. In the next revision of JS, you can use the let construct to create lexical scope. Firefox is the only browser that has it 'as an extension' ;) –  Ryan Oct 16 '11 at 22:45
    

The main difference is that the first method gives you three separate variables, named "one", "two", and "three". They are not related to each other, not connected in any way. The second method puts all the variables into an Array called "myStuff".

Keeping them separate, as in the first method, is often what you want for simple cases. If you need to have them bound together for some reason, for example to pass the set of variables to a function, then the array method would be better.

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1  
It doesn't put the variables into an array, it makes three properties of the object myStuff. –  Ryan Oct 16 '11 at 22:37
var one = 1;
var two = 2;
var three = 3;

Creates three variables with three identifiers

var myStuff = {}
myStuff.one = 1;
myStuff.two = 2;
myStuff.three = 3;

creates a single variable (myStuff) containing three members. The advantage is namespace separation, and the ability to pass/copy/delete the whole variable as one.

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