Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to follow the XMLPerformance example to make an xml parser of my own. So far I'm having the hardest time making autorelease pools work, I get a crash the instant I recreate a pool.

I narrowed down the issue to this test case:

PoolCrashTest.h

#import <SenTestingKit/SenTestingKit.h>

@interface PoolCrashTest : SenTestCase
{
  @private
  NSURLConnection *connection;
  NSAutoreleasePool *downloadAndParsePool;
  BOOL done;
}

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSURLConnection *connection;
@property (nonatomic, assign) NSAutoreleasePool *downloadAndParsePool;

- (void)downloadAndParse:(NSURL *)url;
@end

PoolCrashTest.m

#import "PoolCrashTest.h"

@implementation PoolCrashTest

@synthesize downloadAndParsePool, connection;

- (void)downloadAndParse:(NSURL *)url {
  done = NO;
  self.downloadAndParsePool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
  NSURLRequest *theRequest = [NSURLRequest requestWithURL:url];
  self.connection = [[NSURLConnection alloc] 
                     initWithRequest:theRequest delegate:self];
  if (connection != nil) {
    do {
      [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] runMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode 
                               beforeDate:[NSDate distantFuture]];
    } while (!done);
  }
  self.connection = nil;
  [downloadAndParsePool release];
  self.downloadAndParsePool = nil;
}

#pragma mark NSURLConnection Delegate methods

- (void)connection:(NSURLConnection *)connection 
    didReceiveData:(NSData *)data {
  [downloadAndParsePool drain];

crash after this line ^

  self.downloadAndParsePool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
}

- (void)testPoolCrash
{
  NSURL *dumpURL = [NSURL URLWithString:@"file:///some.xml"];

  [NSThread detachNewThreadSelector:@selector(downloadAndParse:) 
                               toTarget:self withObject:dumpURL];
  sleep(10);
}

@end

Can someone explain how to properly purge autorelease pool in a NSURLConnection delegate running in a thread?

I have tried to follow XMLPerformance as close as possible... I'm targeting Lion with mostly default project settings.

share|improve this question
    
Does it work if you skip drain/alloc pool in didReceiveData? Also i think connection will be leaked as you alloc and retain (via the proptery) and then only release once (assign property to nil). You should probably autorelese it after alloc/init. –  Mattias Wadman Oct 16 '11 at 23:50
    
Mattias: yes, and I should have mentioned that the crash happens in [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] runMode] line, or, rather, it's the last line with source code available in the backtrace -- top of the trace is AutoreleasePoolPage::pop(void*) method, which made me think that I was trying to unrelease some other pool created elsewhere. You're right about connection leak -- that was my sloppy copying-and-pasting. –  melfar Oct 17 '11 at 7:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

craig is correct when he says you're over-releasing your pool. In a non-GC environment, release and drain have the same effect. In a GC environment, release is a no-op for any object, so drain must be used instead. I'd just use drain.

However, NSAutoreleasePool objects aren't really things you should be making a property of your class; they'll work best for you if you restrict their use to a lexical scope. There are a couple of ways you could use a pool in the code you posted above which would be sufficient.

Remember when you're spinning your run loop that it's going to be popping in and out of the call to run the run loop in the common modes; so you could do this instead:

if (connection != nil) {
  do {
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] runMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode 
                             beforeDate:[NSDate distantFuture]];
    [pool drain];
  } while (!done);
}

and you'd be draining any autoreleased objects created in the particular turn of the run loop. Because the connection's delegate callback will be called due to this invocation of the run loop, any autoreleased objects created in the delegate callback will be cleaned up when this pool drains.

If you're not comfortable with this, you could place a pool inside your delegate method depending on how much work your delegate method is likely to be doing:

- (void)connection:(NSURLConnection *)connection didReceiveData:(NSData *)data {
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    // Do whatever work you want here
    [pool drain];
}

And in your case, it would have roughly the same effect.

I would strongly recommend doing something like my first example above and eliminating the autorelease pool behavior you have right now. Keeping NSAutoreleasePool objects to a single lexical scope facilitates everything from debugging to safe exception handling when it becomes necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I think I'll just adopt your method. One thing I overlooked is that I had zombies enabled, and that increased memory usage. I thought I was leaking something. –  melfar Oct 17 '11 at 7:33
    
Good point about the pool's scope - I don't use them often enough, didn't know they shouldn't be ivar'ed. Very helpful. :) –  Craig Otis Oct 17 '11 at 11:36

You're over-releasing your pool.

I'm re-reading your question to make sure I understand, but if you check out the NSAutoreleasePool Documentation you'll see that release and drain should not both be used. (It's nearly identical to simply calling release twice.) Only use drain:

In a garbage-collected environment, there is no need for autorelease pools. You may, however, write a framework that is designed to work in both a garbage-collected and reference-counted environment. In this case, you can use autorelease pools to hint to the collector that collection may be appropriate. In a garbage-collected environment, sending a drain message to a pool triggers garbage collection if necessary; release, however, is a no-op. In a reference-counted environment, drain has the same effect as release. Typically, therefore, you should use drain instead of release.

Edit: This previous question might help you understand how you should use a periodically-drained NSAutoreleasePool in a multi-threaded environment.

share|improve this answer
    
Dont think he over releasing as he alloc and assigns a new pool in didReceiveData, but the release in downloadAndParse should probably be a drain –  Mattias Wadman Oct 16 '11 at 23:29
    
But the alloc/init occurs once, then there's a release and a drain. That's over-releasing. –  Craig Otis Oct 17 '11 at 11:34
    
autorelease pool alloc/init occurs in both downloadAndParse and didReceiveData. The retain/(release or drain) count is in balance but as @chris points out the stack of pools for the current thread can get messed up when you don't restrict your own autorelease pool to one scope. –  Mattias Wadman Oct 17 '11 at 11:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.