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I wrote this solution to Project Euler #215 in java. It doesn't complete the calculations for W(32,10) in less than a minute and It needs to. I was hoping I could get some advice on how to make it faster. I was wondering if adding threads would be appropriate or if there is a way to cache results from each row in the buildWall() method.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

class BlockCombos
{
    static ArrayList<String> possibleRows = new ArrayList<String>();
    static long validWalls = 0;
    static Map<Integer, List> map = new HashMap<Integer, List>();
    static int[][] cache;

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        if (args.length != 2) 
        {
            System.out.println("Error: You need to enter a height and width.");
        }
        else
        {
            int height = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
            int width = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);

            //numbers proportionate to block widths
            //reduced for less overhead (actual widths do not matter)
            ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            numbers.add(new Integer(2));
            numbers.add(new Integer(3));

            startGetBlockCombos(numbers,width);

            int i = 0; //initial row
            for(String row : possibleRows)
            {
                //possible rows
                char[] rowArr = row.toCharArray();
                List<Integer> compatiblerows = new ArrayList<Integer>();
                int k = 0; //rowtocheck index
                for(String rowToCheck : possibleRows)
                {
                    char[] rowToCheckArr = rowToCheck.toCharArray();
                    for(int x = 0; x < rowToCheckArr.length-1; x++)
                    {   

                        if(rowArr[x] == '1' && rowToCheckArr[x] == '1')
                        {
                            //set not compatible
                            break;
                        }
                        else if (x == rowToCheckArr.length-2)
                        {
                            compatiblerows.add(k);
                        }
                    }
                    k ++; //rowtocheck index
                }
                Integer key = new Integer(i);
                map.put(key, compatiblerows);
                i++; //row index
            }

            possibleRows.clear(); //a little clean up
            cache = new int[map.size()][height];
            startBuildWalls(height);
            System.out.print(validWalls);
        }
    }

    static void startBuildWalls(int height)
    {
        height = height-1;
        for(int x = 0; x < map.size(); x++)
        {
            buildWalls(x, height);
        }
        //testing threads from static method

    }
    static void buildWalls(int currentRow, int rowsToGo)
    {
        rowsToGo -=1;
        if(rowsToGo > 0)
        {
            @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
            List<Integer> nextRows = (List<Integer>)map.get(Integer.valueOf(currentRow));

            for(int row : nextRows)
            {
                buildWalls(row,rowsToGo);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            validWalls++;
            return;
        }
    }

    static void startGetBlockCombos(ArrayList<Integer> numbers, int target) 
    {
        ArrayList<Integer> part = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        getBlockCombos(numbers,target,part);
    }

    static void getBlockCombos(ArrayList<Integer> numbers, int target, ArrayList<Integer> partial) 
    {
        int s = 0;
        for (int x: partial)
        {
            s += x;
        }
        if (s == target)
        {
            Integer row[] = new Integer[partial.size()];
            row = partial.toArray(row);
            String rowString = "";

            for (int b : row)
            {
                if (b == 2)
                {
                    rowString = rowString +"01";
                }
                else
                {
                    rowString = rowString + "001";
                }
            }

            BlockCombos.possibleRows.add(rowString);
        }
        else if (s > target)
        {
            return;
        }
        for(int i=0;i<2;i++) 
        {
            int n = numbers.get(i);
            ArrayList<Integer> partial_rec = new ArrayList<Integer>(partial);
            partial_rec.add(n);
            getBlockCombos(numbers,target,partial_rec);
        }
    }
}
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closed as not constructive by Femaref, Brian Roach, Falmarri, interjay, Graviton Oct 17 '11 at 13:39

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You might have more luck here if you ask a more focused question about your algorithm and/or limit the amount of code you post. –  mwd Oct 17 '11 at 1:14
3  
By how much longer than a minute is your algorithm taking? If it is just two minutes, then you've probably implemented what they expected. If it is two hours, then yeah, you've got more work to do, but probably the PE forums for this specific question have more commentary than we could ever generate... –  sarnold Oct 17 '11 at 1:23

2 Answers 2

You are essentially building a graph, G, with nodes equal to the possible rows of width 32 and edges between nodes if one row can be put on top of the other by our rules. This graph has on the order of 2,500 nodes.

Then you want the number of paths in that graph of length 10. There is a trick to enumerating these paths. Create something called the incidence matrix of the graph, and then raise that matrix to the 10th power. Then add up the resulting entries in the result. Note that, given a matrix, A, you can compute A^10 by compute A^2, then A^4, then A^8, then A^8 * A^2. That requires 4 matrix multiplications. It's still a lot of operations, however. There are probably additional linear algebraic or combinatorial tricks you could play to simplify the problem further. In particular, the sum of the entries of A^10 can be written as (1,1,....1)A^10(1,1,...,1)^T. You can actually ge an exact rule for W(32,n) based on the eigenvalues of A

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't event think about using an incidence matrix(2d array). that would reduce the overhead drastically because now I'm using a HashMap. not sure what you mean by raising it to the 10th power but I will look into it.. Its been a while since I did matrix math. –  mgm8870 Oct 17 '11 at 6:25
1  
The incidence matrix is a matrix in the sense of linear algebra, so you can use matrix multiplication to raise it to the nth power. If you are new to linear algebra, matrix multiplication is explained here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_multiplication. One of the cute things about A^n where A is the incidence matrix of a graph is that the (i,j)th entry of A^n is the number of paths of length n from i to j in the graph. –  Thomas Andrews Oct 17 '11 at 14:27
1  
Oh, and one thing I was wrong about - you need the matrix A^9, not A^10. That's because a path of length n in this graph represents a wall of height n+1. –  Thomas Andrews Oct 17 '11 at 14:53

I'm guessing a large portion of your slower algorithm comes from the extreme amount of primitive-to-object and object-to-primitive combined with overly generic datastructures. String objects are slow in almost every language I know of, and this following code segment is probably the one that would show up the strongest if you were to run your code through a profiler. (Which would be worth doing, by the way.)

        String rowString = "";

        for (int b : row)
        {
            if (b == 2)
            {
                rowString = rowString +"01";
            }
            else
            {
                rowString = rowString + "001";
            }
        }

I do not know any language where string concatenation is a fast operation. These concat operations here create a new String object from the "01" and "001" strings (the first time through), create a new string object to hold the concatenation with the rowString string, replace a reference, all to append the string to a variable-sized BlockCombos object.

If I had to improve upon this, I'd probably switch away from strings to static-sized arrays of char. (Robin recommends switching to StringBuilder -- which, if this were variable-sized objects I would probably agree with. I think arrays of char still make most sense because the length of your objects is fixed and known ahead of time.)

One thing to definitely think about -- they asked for 32x10. That 32 is exactly long enough to store a row as a single integer, if you use 1 bits to indicate brick boundaries. Then your giant loop checking boundaries between rows can be reduced to a simple bitwise AND operation. If the result is non-zero, then you've got brick boundaries stacked. That would replace an entire loop with a single VM instruction, but would definitely change how you build walls.

share|improve this answer
    
I was going to do just that and store it as a char[] however the getBlockCombos() method is not slow at all. What really seems to be slowing it down is buildWalls() which recursively goes through all the valid row combinations and expands the wall X levels deep. I will try to see if I can run it though a profiler. I am using a mac. Not sure what the best one would be. –  mgm8870 Oct 17 '11 at 1:56
    
It is adding string literals, which means they are only created once and all repeated references will use the same instances. You are correct about String concat being relatively slow, although I would replace it with a StingBuilder before going to char arrays. In either case, definitely profile. FYI, Java doesn't use reference counting. –  Robin Oct 17 '11 at 2:08
    
The JVM will optimise the inner rowString = rowString + "01; calls, but it won't optimise the outer concats. –  Falmarri Oct 17 '11 at 3:51
    
@Robin, thanks; I had thought perhaps mark-and-sweep vs reference counting might be left to an implementation detail. But in retrospect, that would probably go heavily against the "write once, run anywhere" goal of Java to leave such an important detail to implementors. –  sarnold Oct 18 '11 at 21:05
    
@Falmarri, thanks; that's good to know. –  sarnold Oct 18 '11 at 21:06

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