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Using Rails 3.1.1

I'm modeling associations between Animals (individual dogs) and Litters (groups of offspring). It gets complicated because an animal is both born into a litter and can parent many litters (as either a mother or a father).

Here are the relevant parts of my schema:

ActiveRecord::Schema.define do

  create_table "animals", :force => true do |t|
    ...
    t.integer  "litter_id"
    t.string   "sex"
    ...
  end

  create_table "litters", :force => true do |t|
    ...
    t.integer  "father_id"
    t.integer  "mother_id"
    ...
  end
end

And here are the appropriate models, with what I think could work as associations:

class Animal < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...
  belongs_to :litter
  has_many   :litters, :foreign_key => :father_id
  has_many   :litters, :foreign_key => :mother_id
  has_one    :father,  :through => :litter, :foreign_key => :father_id
  has_one    :mother,  :through => :litter, :foreign_key => :mother_id
  ...
end

class Litter < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...
  has_many   :animals
  belongs_to :father, :class_name => 'Animal'
  belongs_to :mother, :class_name => 'Animal'    
  ...
end

Will I run into problems if I double up on belongs_to and has_many associations in their respective models? If so, how can I properly model those associations?


UPDATE: As mentioned in a comment below, I'm using the Litter model to track about 10 attributes that are common to every Animal in that Litter. This software will be run by dog breeders, so the Litter is itself a relevant unit from several standpoints, and will carry a lot of weight (beyond parent/child relationships) when it comes to surfacing data in views.

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2 Answers 2

Not knowing any of Ruby, Rails or ActiveRecord, still I think what you need a Graph library (the data-structure not the picture) and a persistence layer which stores it for you. Here is a Ruby Graph library, persistence is on you.

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yeah, just happened to see this one at the top of the list when I clicked on to the home site. Never mind me if @normalocity is correct. JAPH –  Joel Berger Oct 17 '11 at 4:00
    
or as he deleted the comment, maybe I should stand my ground (wow I feel out of place :-P) –  Joel Berger Oct 17 '11 at 4:01

You should be able to just treat all dogs as animals.

Each animal will go something like this (untested):

belongs_to :mother, :class_name => "Animal", :foreign_key => "mother_id"
belongs_to :father, :class_name => "Animal", :foreign_key => "father_id"
has_many :children, :through => :animals # not sure if you need a foreign key specification here

animals table:

id | mother_id | father_id 

The oldest ancestor that you keep track of won't have parents, so their mother_id and father_id will be nil.

The only reason I can see for keeping track of the litter_id is to keep track of siblings, which might be something you need. In that case you can have the litter be its own object, as in your example, or you can do a simple check like:

class Animal < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...

  def is_sibling_of(animal)
     self.mother == animal.mother
  end

  ...    
end

...or an object scope (was called named_scope previous to Rails3):

class Animal < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...

  scope :siblings, lambda {|animal| {:conditions => ["id not in (?) AND mother_id = ?", animal.id, animal.mother.id} }

  ...
end

Which would give you a list of all siblings of the specified animal, not including the animal itself.

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There are reasons (outside the scope of this question) that I want to track data about Litters anyway. Given that there will be a Litter model anyway, is it still best to repeat the mother/father combo that every puppy in that litter shares? (That doesn't strike me as a very normal data structure, since updating the father of a litter, for instance, would then require updating the record of each Animal in that Litter... but I'm no expert.) –  jasonmklug Oct 17 '11 at 4:02
    
I guess that depends on how much your software model reflects the real world/which situations you want to model. I mean, when does your father ever change? It would be set upon creation (birth) of the animals, and wouldn't ever change, correct? We're not talking divorces, step-dog-fathers, and the like, I presume? I suppose it's possible to know a dog is alive, but not know who its father is (which means it would start out as nil and eventually change to something), so in that case, yes, having the litter as an intermediate object is totally valid. –  jefflunt Oct 17 '11 at 4:11
    
The father wouldn't necessarily be the thing that changes--it was just an attribute that happened to be in the scope of the question that could change. Litter columns will include things such as expected_birth_date, breed_id, notes, et cetera (not all of which will change, obviously, but a few of which might). There are 10 columns in my litters table, so that's a lot of repeating data that's always common across all of the animals in a given litter. –  jasonmklug Oct 17 '11 at 4:21
    
Sorry for the long delay here, but I was thinking about this problem more, and found the following discussion, which may or may not be helpful. railsforum.com/viewtopic.php?id=1248 It's largely a re-stating of what I have above, but with a slightly modified perspective and some extra discussion. –  jefflunt Nov 7 '11 at 18:21

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