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I've got a form that looks like this:

class Cas_Form_Company extends Zend_Form
{
    /**
     * @param Cas_Model_Company|null $company
     */
    public function __construct(Cas_Model_Company $company = null)
    {
        parent::__construct();

        $id = new Zend_Form_Element_Hidden('id');

        $name = new Zend_Form_Element_Text('name');
        $name->addValidator('stringLength', false, array(2,45));
        $name->addValidator(new Cas_Model_Validate_CompanyUnique());
        $name->setLabel('Name');

        $submit = new Zend_Form_Element_Submit('Submit');

        if ($company)
        {
            $id->setValue($company->GetId());
            $name->setValue($company->GetName());
        }

        $this->addElements(array($id, $name, $submit));
        $this->setMethod('post');
        $this->setAction(Zend_Controller_Front::getInstance()->getBaseUrl() . '/Asset/company');
    }

    public function Commit()
    {
        if (!$this->valid())
        {
            throw new Exception('Company form is not valid.');
        }

        $data = $this->getValues();
        if (empty($data['id']))
        {
            Cas_Model_Gateway_Company::Create($data['name']);
        }
        else
        {
            $company = Cas_Model_Gateway_Company::FindById((int)$data['id']);
            $company->SetName($data['name']);
            Cas_Model_Gateway_Company::Commit($company);
        }
    }
}

Now, this form depends on a controller, which looks something like this:

public function companyAction()
{
    if ($this->getRequest()->isPost())
    {
        if ($this->getRequest()->getParam('submit') == 'Delete')
        {
            Cas_Model_Gateway_Company::Delete(Cas_Model_Gateway_Company::FindById((int)$this->getRequest()->getParam('id')));
            $this->_helper->redirector->setCode(303)->gotoSimple('companies');
        }

        $form = new Cas_Form_Company();
        if ($form->isValid($this->getRequest()->getParams()))
        {
            $form->Commit();
            $this->_helper->redirector->setCode(303)->gotoSimple('index');
        }
        $this->view->form = $form;
    }
    else if ($id = $this->getRequest()->getParam('id'))
    {
        $form = new Cas_Form_Company(Cas_Model_Gateway_Company::FindById($id));
        $this->view->form = $form;
    }
    else
    {
        $this->view->form = new Cas_Form_Company();
    }
    $this->_helper->viewRenderer->setScriptAction('formrender');
}

It seems like the controller action is doing "too much" here, but I don't see an easy way to work around this. Generally speaking, I think the form should be the one worried about whether it's an add or edit or delete operation. But I can't seem to find a good way of going about doing that.

Is this a normal pattern for someone using Zend_Form or have I done something wrong?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's perfectly fine, all you are doing is sending values to your form and handling the response, redirecting a bit and handling the view.

Each of these things fits really good and would be a hassle to find if you've placed them elsewhere. I wouldn't think of "fat controllers" as in "requires more LOC than other controllers/actions" but rather "contains business logic". If you feel the cyclomatic complexity is becoming too large, try splitting your action into smaller ones.

edit: Actually, I would refactor the $form->Commit(); part to something like $repository->create($form->getValues() since a) nothing internal is used in Cas_Form_Company::Commit(), and; b) you will want to have storage related functions separated from validating & displaying your form. Think about debugging/changing the way your data is stored and you will now where to look if all f.ex. classes containing queries are doing that and only that - handling the DAL.

share|improve this answer
    
Erm, the repository is Cas_Model_Gateway_Company. You're saying you think the gateway layer should be responsible for deciding whether things should be edited or created? –  Billy ONeal Oct 17 '11 at 17:41
    
@BillyONeal, sure, that would be fine by me. Return a status code including created/updated if you will. You'll have to decide if you want the client code to check on each call if it should update() or create() or you could just commit() and have it return a status data structure if the action matters: array('action' => 'create', 'id' => 3) etc. I'd just have anything responsible for handling storage & retrieval of data in your gateway classes. –  chelmertz Oct 17 '11 at 21:17

It seems you mix up some responsibilities in your form, model and controller. Usually I introduce a service layer when I have some interactions with models from the controller, based on form data.

Also, I see you are handling multiple functions in one action, which I'd split between different actions. If you are working with a Company model, I'd suggest to create a CompanyController:

class CompanyController extends Zend_Controller_Action {}

Next, you probably want to view the company details on one page, modify these on another and create a new instance on a third page. I usually do this with a viewAction(), editAction() and newAction():

public function indexAction ()
{
    $service   = new Cas_Service_Company;
    $companies = $service->getAllCompanies();

    if (!count($companies)) {
        throw new Zend_Controller_Action_Exception('No companies found');
    }

    $this->view->companies = $companies;
}

public function viewAction ()
{
    $service = new Cas_Service_Company;
    $company = $service->getCompany($this->getRequest()->getQuery('id'));

    if (false === $company) {
        throw new Zend_Controller_Action_Exception('Company not found');
    }

    $this->view->company = $company;
}

public function editAction ()
{
    $request = $this->getRequest();
    $service = new Cas_Service_Company;
    $company = $service->getCompany($request->getQuery('id'));

    if (false === $company) {
        throw new Zend_Controller_Action_Exception('Company not found');
    }

    $form = new Cas_Form_Company(array('company' => $company));
    if ($request->isPost() && $form->isValid($request->getPost())) {
        $service->updateCompany($company, $form);
        // redirect here to company view for example
    }

    $this->view->form    = $form;
    $this->view->company = $company;
}

public function newAction ()
{
    $request = $this->getRequest();
    $form    = new Cas_Form_Company;
    if ($request->isPost() && $form->isValid($request->getPost())) {
        $company = $service->createCompany($form);
        // redirect here to company view for example
    }

    $this->view->form    = $form;
}

public function deleteAction ()
{
    $request = $this->getRequest();
    $form    = new Cas_Form_DeleteCompany;
    if ($request->isPost() && $form->isValid($request->getPost())) {
        $service->deleteCompany($form);
        // redirect here to index for example
    }

    $this->view->form    = $form;
}

Now you have seperate actions for all functions, it's quite easy to set up a form for Company:

class Cas_Form_Company extends Zend_Form
{
    protected $_company;

    public function init ()
    {
        $this->addElement('text', 'name', array(
            'label' => 'Name'
        ));

        // More elements here

        if (null !== $this->_company) {
            $this->populate($this->_company->toArray());
        }
    }

    public function setCompany (Cas_Model_Company $company)
    {
        $this->_company = $company;
    }
}

In the form I use several neat features:

  1. Use init() instead of __construct(), no need to call parent::__construct() and the setOptions() is called. That is beneficial for #2 here:
  2. Use a setter for Cas_Model_Company. When you need more dependencies, it's just a matter of putting them in the array when you construct the form (see editAction() as an example in the controller)
  3. Inject form data simply by a check if you've set $this->_company. In my case I use Doctrine, so the toArray() is already there. Otherwise, you need to create this method yourself.

The last piece to put everything together is the service layer. Martin Fowler described this also in his book P of EAA and on his website: http://martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/serviceLayer.html

A typical service class looks in my case always like this:

class Cas_Service_Company
{
    public function getCompany ($id)
    {
        // Get a Cas_Model_Company and load data from database
        // Example for Doctrine:

        $company = new Cas_Model_Company;
        $company = $company->find($id);
        return $company;
    }

    public function getAllCompanies ()
    {
        // Get a Cas_Model_Company and load all data from database
        // Example for Doctrine:

        $company   = new Cas_Model_Company;
        $companies = $company->findAll();
        return $companies;
    }

    public function updateCompany (Cas_Model_Company $company, Cas_Form_Company $form)
    {
        // Update model with new form data
        // Example for Doctrine:

        $company->fromArray($form->toArray());
        $company->save();

        return $company;
    }

    public function createCompany (Cas_Form_Company $form)
    {
        // Create model with form data
        // Example for Doctrine:

        $company   = new Cas_Model_Company;
        $company->fromArray($form->toArray());
        $company->save();

        return $company;
    }

    public function deleteCompany (Cas_Form_DeleteCompany $form)
    {
        // Get a Cas_Model_Company and load data from database
        // Example for Doctrine:

        $company = new Cas_Model_Company;
        $company = $company->find($form->getValue('id'));

        // Remove this instance
        if (false !== $company) {
            $company->delete();
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

With this kind of service layer, you keep all code to access and modify models in one place. When you need another query (find a company based on a specific criteria) you can just add that method to your server class and call the method in (for example) a controller. It will keep your code very clean.

To conclude: use a service layer and just use the controller as information agent: getting data from source A and bring it to point B. Make a setter for your form to accept the model and use it as a kind of a decorator pattern

share|improve this answer
    
There is a service layer -- that's Cas_Model_Gateway_Company. The DTO is just Cas_Model_Company. (You don't see any database access components in Cas_Form_Company, do you? :) ) –  Billy ONeal Oct 17 '11 at 17:31
    
@BillyONeal I don't think you should keep the service layer in your Cas_Model_* namespace, because a service layer is wrapped around your domain layer (Cas_Model_*), see the PofEAA for the description. Keeping it inside Cas_Model_* will give a bad impression what it does. Perhaps you confuse a service layer with a table data gateway, which is implemented by Zend_Db_Table for example. You can place table data gateway under the Cas_Model_Gateway_*, but be aware of the difference between a service and a table data gateway. –  Jurian Sluiman Oct 18 '11 at 8:59
    
What also happens, is you utilize this service both in your controllers and forms. You should either choose one of them. I see the controller rather as police officer directing all the traffic from one point to another and don't like it that forms can instantiate service classes. That's a mix-up of responsibilities. I'd rather give them a dependency directly on the model, keeping it independent from the service or gateway you are using. –  Jurian Sluiman Oct 18 '11 at 9:04
    
As a third argument, you use everywhere static methods which I consider as bad practice if you are acting on instances of entities in your domain layer. Make an instance of your service layer which accepts instances of your models. The usage of static methods isn't really justified in this case. –  Jurian Sluiman Oct 18 '11 at 9:06
    
I'm not going to bother with making instances of something that does not contain any state just for the hell of it. As for putting the service layer somewhere else, that's nice, but it really has nothing to do with the question I asked -- which was having too much code in the controller. As for making the forms dependent on the model directly, that's not possible. I don't get everything from the database as objects before writing it out; that ends up being too slow for most "list" pages. –  Billy ONeal Oct 18 '11 at 15:09

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