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In the code below, why is the size of the packed structure different on Linux and Windows when compiled with gcc?

#include <inttypes.h>
#include <cstdio>

// id3 header from an mp3 file
struct header
{    
        uint8_t version[ 2 ];
        uint8_t flags;
        uint32_t size;
} __attribute__((packed));

int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
        printf( "%u\n", (unsigned int)sizeof( header ) );
        return 0;
}

gcc versions used:

$ g++ --version
g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.5.2-8ubuntu4) 4.5.2
$ x86_64-w64-mingw32-g++ --version
x86_64-w64-mingw32-g++ (GCC) 4.7.0 20110831 (experimental)

Compile and test:

$ g++ -Wall packed.cpp -o packed && ./packed
7
$ x86_64-w64-mingw32-g++ -Wall packed.cpp -o packed.exe
--> prints '8' when run on Windows.

The Linux binary prints the expected size of 7 bytes, the Windows binary 8 bytes. Why the difference?

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7  
Cuz itz teh windows? –  quasiverse Oct 17 '11 at 5:23
2  
6 upvotes in 4 min. This has to be good... –  Mysticial Oct 17 '11 at 5:25
1  
My guess is the attribute somehow gets ignored (because of a bug). Use offsetof(header, size) to find out if it's so. –  cnicutar Oct 17 '11 at 5:26
1  
If I compile it directly from windows xp with MinGW g++ 4.5.2, it prints 7. 32 bit though. –  Vlad Oct 17 '11 at 5:28
6  
Side note: Any C or C++ code that relies on specific struct member alignment (e.g. reading or writing structures directly to disk or network) smells bad... –  6502 Oct 17 '11 at 5:48
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Section 6.37.3 of the gcc attributes explains it as a difference in ABI specs, see here: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Type-Attributes.html

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1  
The microsoft compiler lets you pack the members as tight as you like. See: #pragma pack for the MS compiler. –  harper Oct 17 '11 at 5:40
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g66 4.7.0 does it this way to be compatible with 64-bit MSVC++. If you want to pack the structure properly, compile with -mno-ms-bitfields. (But then your layout will be incompatible with MSVC++.)

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The attribute((packed)) is compiler-specific to GCC. Hence, that code won't even compile with MSVC++. Maybe you used another compiler for Windows, though. However, with MSVC++ you could do this:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <cstdio>

// id3 header from an mp3 file
#pragma pack(push,1)
struct header
{    
        uint8_t version[ 2 ];
        uint8_t flags;
        uint32_t size;
};
#pragma pack(pop)

int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
        printf( "%u\n", (unsigned int)sizeof( header ) );
        return 0;
}

and the struct will be 7 bytes.

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4  
But it'll compile just fine using mingw under windows, which it appears the OP is using –  Necrolis Oct 17 '11 at 6:06
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This is all about attribute and word alignment in memory

see if you write

struct header
{    
        uint8_t version[ 2 ];
        uint8_t flags;
        uint32_t size;
};

then linux & windows both have size 8

but when you specify attribute to avoid default world allignment then

struct header
{    
        uint8_t version[ 2 ];
        uint8_t flags;
        uint32_t size;
} __attribute__((packed));

then in linux because of attritube size becomes 7

see gcc spec says that

If packed is used on a structure, or if bit-fields are used 
it may be that the Microsoft ABI packs them differently than 
GCC would normally pack them. 
share|improve this answer
    
why downvote....? –  Mr.32 Oct 17 '11 at 5:57
1  
Perhaps because the compiler specific bit does not matter ? What matters is the quote about ABI. –  Matthieu M. Oct 17 '11 at 6:39
    
i have added that bcz user is going to compile program with attribute((packed)) in windows, attribute((packed)) is not supported in windows compiler –  Mr.32 Oct 17 '11 at 6:48
2  
"windows compiler"? OP specifies he uses GCC both on linux and Windows - MSVC isn't the only compiler around for Windows. –  snemarch Oct 17 '11 at 8:21
    
okey i got point i hv removed that –  Mr.32 Oct 17 '11 at 8:30
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