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mysql-cluster-expert-5.1 document mentioned that: "MySQL Cluster tables in MySQL 5.1 are normally stored completely in memory rather than on disk (this is why we refer to MySQL cluster as an in-memory database)" which means mysql cluster is a distributed memory database, so has anybody ever done a comparison of mysql cluster & redis on speed?

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I don't think redis does anything remotely similar to MySQL cluster, so you can't compare them.

MySQL cluster is a high-availability, fuly durable SQL cluster with fully synchronous replication. Redis is not. As far as I understand, redis supports neither synchronous replication, nor SQL.

MySQL cluster means that when you can COMMIT TRANSACTION**, if you lose any cluster member permanently 1ms later, your data are still safe. MySQL cluster query nodes (which are the clients) automatically fail-over in a very short time (typically < 5 seconds).

Redis does absolutely none of this. It is a non-SQL based data store which has master-slave replication (failover? You'd better implement it yourself)

You may as well ask if a motorbike is faster than an ocean liner.

** I don't think redis supports transactions, so that notion is rubbish as well.

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thank you very much for the reply, i think i failed to specify the detail, that it's the simplest query speed i'm concerning instead of full functionality. AFAIK, redis is the fastest memory database currently, i just wonder if mysql-cluster as a memory database, can match redis on speed for simple queries like select without join, insert a record, etc. –  xpu Oct 17 '11 at 7:49
    
It is highly unlikely that anyone has carried out such a test, but I predict that MySQL cluster (in a high-availability configuration) is vastly slower. And an ocean liner is slower than a motorbike too, but it carries 3000 more people and can go on water. –  MarkR Oct 17 '11 at 9:27
    
Redis does have transactions - see redis.io/topics/transactions –  DNA Mar 21 '12 at 14:47
    
Redis transactions still don't support durability in any sensible way - from reading the manual. You can't compare MySQL cluster and Redis. –  MarkR Mar 22 '12 at 6:23

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