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How would I bind the this pointer in the objects prototype to the object's instance?

function Foo(){ }
Foo.prototype.f1 = function(){this.f2();} //is wrong because 'this' does not refer to Foo instance
Foo.prototype.f2 = function(){}

This is really annoying. Can anyone help? I tried doing _.bindAll(this,'f1','f2') inside Foo's constructor but no luck.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You mention in a comment that you are setting f1 as event handler with:

canvas.addListner('mousedown',this.f1, false)

Instead, you can pass a closure:

var self = this;
canvas.addListner('mousedown',function() {
    self.f1();
}, false);

or use the bind methods of the Underscore.js library:

canvas.addListner('mousedown', _.bind(this.f1, this), false);
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This works:

function Foo() {
    this.f1 = this.f1.bind(this);
    this.f2 = this.f2.bind(this);
}

Foo.prototype.f1 = function () { this.f2(); };
Foo.prototype.f2 = function () { console.log("f2"); };

var foo = new Foo();
var f = foo.f1;
f();

http://jsfiddle.net/VYdNx/3/

As does this:

function Foo() {
    _.bindAll(this);
}

Foo.prototype.f1 = function () { this.f2(); };
Foo.prototype.f2 = function () { console.log("f2"); };

var foo = new Foo();
var f = foo.f1;
f();

http://jsfiddle.net/VYdNx/2/

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Try this:

    var Foo = function() {};
    Foo.prototype.f1 = function() {this.f2();};
    Foo.prototype.f2 = function() {};
    var foo = new Foo();
    var proxyFn = function(fooInstance) {
        fooInstance.f1();
    };
    canvas.addListener('mousedown', proxyFn(foo), false);

Or something more generic:

    var bindFunction = function(fnToBind, scopeObj) {
        return function() {  // closure scope will contain bindFunction args
            fnToBind.call(scopeObj);
        };
    };
    var Foo = function() {};
    Foo.prototype.f1 = function() {this.f2();};
    Foo.prototype.f2 = function() {};
    var foo = new Foo();
    var proxyFn = bindFunction(Foo.prototype.f1, foo);
    canvas.addListener('mousedown', proxyFn, false);
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Your code should be changed to:

function Foo() {
  this.f1 = function() {
    this.f2();
  }
  this.f2 = function() {
  }
}
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That is what I ended up doing, but that is just ugly. I would prefer to 'separate' out the interface –  user814628 Oct 17 '11 at 6:15

Your code would work correctly if you used var foo = new Foo();. Then, just use foo.f1();. foo will be this in f1.

The reason is that when you use new against a constructor function, a _proto link will be attached to the object that will be the new instance. This _proto_ link points to the prototype of the constructor function. At runtime, if an accessed property/method of the instance does not exist on the instance directly, the interpreter will follow the _proto_, and try to access the property/method there.

If you want to call a function with an explicit object as this, you can do myFunc.call(myObjThatWillBeThis).

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The problem is, sorry I wasn't clear, imagine f1 being a onMouseDown function calling f2, where the onMouseDown is a registered as a listener for canvas via canvas.addListner('mousedown',this.f1,false) in Foo's constructor –  user814628 Oct 17 '11 at 6:14

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