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I would like to have a clean C# class that authenticates from Active Directory.

It should be pretty simple, it just has to ask for credentials and check if it matches what AD is expecting.

I am responsible for a number of C# applications, and I would like all of them to use the same class.

Could someone please provide a clean code sample of such a class? It should have good error handling, be well commented, and specifically ask for credentials rather than try to read if a user is already logged in to AD for another application. (This is a security requirement because some applications are used in areas with shared computers: People with multiple roles and different permission levels may use the same computer and forget to log out between sessions)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/316748

public bool IsAuthenticated(String domain, String username, String pwd)
{
  String domainAndUsername = domain + "\\" + username;
  DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry(_path, domainAndUsername, pwd);

  try
  { //Bind to the native AdsObject to force authentication.			
     Object obj = entry.NativeObject;

     DirectorySearcher search = new DirectorySearcher(entry);

     search.Filter = "(SAMAccountName=" + username + ")";
     search.PropertiesToLoad.Add("cn");
     SearchResult result = search.FindOne();

     if(null == result)
     {
         return false;
     }

     //Update the new path to the user in the directory.
     _path = result.Path;
     _filterAttribute = (String)result.Properties["cn"][0];
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
     throw new Exception("Error authenticating user. " + ex.Message);
  }

     return true;
 }
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Admittedly I have no experience programming against AD, but the link below seems it might address your problem.

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/system/everythingInAD.aspx#35

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There's some reason you can't use Windows integrated authentication, and not bother users with entering their names and passwords? That's simultaneously the most usable and secure solution when possible.

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1  
This is a security requirement because some applications are used in areas with shared computers: People with multiple roles and different permission levels may use the same computer and forget to log out between sessions –  Kaiser Advisor Apr 22 '09 at 20:24

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