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This is an example of what my code looks like:

void *a = NULL;
void *b = //something;
a = (void *)(*((char *)b + 4));

The value that (b+4) is pointing to is an address that I want to store in a. When I try to compile, I get "warning: cast to pointer from integer of different size." What does this mean, and what should I do to fix it?

EDIT: To clarify, I don't want 'a' to point to an address that is 4 bytes greater than 'b'. In my program, I know that the value stored at ((char *)b + 4) is itself another pointer, and I want to store this pointer in 'a'.

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a char*:

(char *)b + 4

That means that this:

*((char *)b + 4)

is a char. Then you proceed to cast that char to a void* and the compiler complains. You don't have to manually cast to void* in C so just this should do:

a = (char *)b + 4;

Update for comments: Sounds like you're after this:

a = *(char **)((char *)b + 4)
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Thank you for the clarification. Now I understand what I did, but my goal is not for 'a' to point to an address 4 bytes greater than 'b'. In my program, I know that the value stored at ((char *)b +4) is itself another pointer, and I want to store this pointer in 'a'. –  David Oct 17 '11 at 6:56
    
@David: See my update please, I think that's what you're after if I'm understanding you. –  mu is too short Oct 17 '11 at 7:09
1  
Yes, thank you! I'm assuming (char **) means it's a pointer to a pointer? I'm still pretty new to C, so dealing with pointers is confusing for me. –  David Oct 17 '11 at 7:43
    
@David: Yes, char** means "pointer to pointer to char". –  mu is too short Oct 17 '11 at 8:14
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it would improve the readability, if you wrote the statements apart I did this for you and get:

char *c = (char *)b;
char *d = c + 4;
a = (void *)
        (*d); // <- this is c char and you want to cast it to a pointer

seems like you wrote an asterisk too much

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What it sounds like: something is wrong in your pointers.

In this case, re-examine your expression: is that really the address of a char you're getting?

(void *)(*((char *)b + 4));

so

(char *)b

is a pointer to char, as is

(char *)b+4

but then *((char *)b+4) is dereferencing (char *)b+4, so that's type char -- and you're then trying to cast that thing, which is probably 1 byte, into a 4 or 8 byte address. Ergo, mismatched sizes.

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void *a = NULL;
char jig[10]="jigarkumar";
void *b = jig;
printf("b is %p",b);
a = (void *)(((char *)b + 4));
printf("\na is %p",a);

problem is here

a = (void *)(*((char *)b + 4));
             ^
             |

this * fetch the value stored at b+4 address & it is assigned to a which is wrong so just remove that & your code will work fine

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