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Int this class where operator<< is defined (see code) while trying to compile it with gcc 4.6.1 I'm getting following error: no match for 'operator<<' in 'std::cout << a'. What's going on?

template<class Int_T = int, typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Min_Range = std::numeric_limits<Int_T>::min(),
                            typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Max_Range = std::numeric_limits<Int_T>::max()>
class Int
{
Int_T data_;  

Int_T get_data()const
{
return data_;
}

};  
//Here is this operator defined
template<class Int_T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Int<Int_T, Best_Fit<Int_T>::type, Best_Fit<Int_T>::type>& obj)
{
    out << obj.get_data();
    return out;
}

where Best_Fit looks like:

#ifndef BEST_FIT_H_INCLUDED
#define BEST_FIT_H_INCLUDED


struct Signed_Type
{
    typedef long long type;
};

struct Unsigned_Type
{
    typedef unsigned long long type;
};

template<bool Cond, class First, class Second>
struct if_
{
    typedef typename First::type type;
};

template<class First, class Second>
struct if_<false,First,Second>
{
    typedef typename Second::type type;
};

template<class Int_T>
struct Best_Fit
{//evaluate it lazily ;)
    typedef typename if_<std::is_signed<Int_T>::value,Signed_Type,Unsigned_Type>::type type;
};

#endif // BEST_FIT_H_INCLUDED

edit:

#include <iostream>  
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Int<signed char,1,20> a(30);

    cout << a;
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you provide an example with main? – BЈовић Oct 17 '11 at 7:23
    
@VJo edited, see OP – smallB Oct 17 '11 at 7:30
    
That's some happy template magic. You are wrapping standard numeric types, aren't you? If it's no secret, what is your goal? Why are you doing this? – Septagram Oct 17 '11 at 7:31
    
@Septagram of course this isn't a secret - my goal is to create safe int class. I'm doing this to practice template (meta) programming – smallB Oct 17 '11 at 7:34
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas When I add typename I'm getting compiler error telling me that value/type mismatch has "come to town" – smallB Oct 17 '11 at 7:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your template has three arguments, a type, and two constants of a known best fit type, but your templated operator<< takes an instantiation of the template with three types.

template<class Int_T = int, typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Min_Range
                                     = std::numeric_limits<Int_T>::min(), // constant!
                            typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Max_Range
                                     = std::numeric_limits<Int_T>::max()  // constant!
        >
class Int
//...
template<class Int_T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, 
                         const Int<Int_T, 
                                   Best_Fit<Int_T>::type, // type!
                                   Best_Fit<Int_T>::type  // type!
                         >& obj)

I usually recommend that operator overloads of class templates are defined inside the class definition (use friend to define a free function in that context) for this particular reason, it is trivial to get the types right inside the class template, and easy to fail outside of it. There are a couple other differences (like the fact that if the operator is defined inside the class then it will only be accessible through ADL --unless you also decide to declare it outside)

template<class Int_T = int, typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Min_Range
                                     = std::numeric_limits<Int_T>::min(), // constant!
                            typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Max_Range
                                     = std::numeric_limits<Int_T>::max()  // constant!
        >
class Int {
   friend                  // allows you to define a free function inside the class
   std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& out, 
                             Int const & obj ) {  // Can use plain Int to refer to this 
                                                  // intantiation. No need to redeclare
                                                  // all template arguments
       return out << obj.get_data();
   }
};
share|improve this answer
    
so what would you suggest? – smallB Oct 17 '11 at 7:44
    
So what you're saying is that I should declare it as a class member? But is there a way to declare it as a "free standing" fnc? – smallB Oct 17 '11 at 7:48
    
I have edited the answer, the simplest thing you can do is define the operator inside the class scope. Or you can try and fix the template. Not tried, so no guarantees: template <typename Int_T, typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Min_Range, typename Best_Fit<Int_T>::type Max_Range> std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& o, Int< Int_T, Min_Range, Max_Range> const & obj ) {... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 17 '11 at 7:49
    
Not as a member function, but declare and define it inside the class scope as a free function. You can do that with the friend keyword: class X { friend ostream& operator<<( ostream& o, X const & x ) { return o; } declares and defines a free-standing function in the enclosing namespace that can only be found through ADL. All identifiers present inside the X type can be used directly, as we are inside the class context while defining the function. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 17 '11 at 7:51
    
I have it already defined in class scope. I'll try you're template and let you know. – smallB Oct 17 '11 at 7:52

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