Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Check out this code. This is a very simple JavaScript object which is implemented using Module Pattern (and you can see the live example at this fiddle address)

var human = function() {
    var _firstName = '';
    var _lastName = ''
    return {
        get firstName() {
            return _firstName;
        }, get lastName() {
            return _lastName;
        }, set firstName(name) {
            _firstName = name;
        }, set lastName(name) {
            _lastName = name;
        }, get fullName() {
            return _firstName + ' ' + _lastName;
        }
    }
}();
human.firstName = 'Saeed';
human.lastName = 'Neamati';
alert(human.fullName);

However, IE8 doesn't support JavaScript get and set keywords. You can both test it and see MDN.

What should I do to make this script compatible with IE8 too?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

What should I do to make this script compatible with IE8 too?

Change it completely. For example, instead of using accessor properties, use a combination of normal properties and functions:

human.firstName = 'Saeed';
human.lastName  = 'Neamati';
alert(human.getFullName());

Somebody else suggested using a DOM object in IE and adding the properties using Object.defineProperty(). While it may work, I'd highly recommend against this approach for several reasons, an example being that the code you write may not be compatible in all browsers:

var human = document.createElement('div');
Object.defineProperty(human, 'firstName', { ... });
Object.defineProperty(human, 'lastName',  { ... });
Object.defineProperty(human, 'children',  { value: 2 });

alert(human.children);
//-> "[object HTMLCollection]", not 2

This is true of at least Chrome. Either way it's safer and easier to write code that works across all the browsers you want to support. Any convenience you gain from being able to write code to take advantage of getters and setters has been lost on the extra code you wrote specifically targeting Internet Explorer 8.

This is, of course, in addition to the reduction in performance, the fact that you will not be able to use a for...in loop on the object and the potential confusion ensuing when you use a property you thought you defined but was pre-existing on the DOM object.

share|improve this answer
    
I meant how can I make my code backward compatible. What is the solution to implement a module pattern in JavaScript that works in IE8 also, and which has getter properties? –  Saeed Neamati Oct 17 '11 at 8:56
1  
@SaeedNeamati If you really want getters/setters, you can do two things: 1) make methods such as .getMyValue and .setMyValue, or 2) make methods that accept a value, or return it if no value given (like what jQuery does with some methods - if you give a value it sets, if you don't give a value it gets). –  Camilo Martin Oct 2 '12 at 1:42
    
Worst answer ever. Can't believe it got that much upvotes. –  DontVoteMeDown Jan 21 '14 at 16:39
    
@DontVoteMeDown: I'm sorry you feel that way, but I'm sure there are worse answers. You know, like answers that are incorrect ;-). –  Andy E Jan 22 '14 at 10:26
1  
@BT: setting aside your attempt at blaming your poor reading comprehension on the wording in my answer, I'd like to point out that the OP was happy enough to accept this answer and, whilst I could have promoted the bad practice indicated in your own answer, I feel that is a solution no self-respecting JavaScript developer would ever use, let alone encourage others to. Sometimes the harsh realisation of "I'll have to approach this some other way" is best for everyone. –  Andy E Jan 26 '14 at 23:12

You cannot (as Andy answered)

The closest alternative would be

var human = function() {
    var _firstName = '';
    var _lastName = '';

    return {
        firstName: function() {
            if (arguments.length === 1) {
                _firstName = arguments[0];
            }
            else {
                return _firstName;
            }
        },
        lastName: function() {
            if (arguments.length === 1) {
                _lastName = arguments[0];
            }
            else {
                return _lastName;
            }
        },
        fullName: function() {
            return _firstName + ' ' + _lastName;
        }
    };
}();

human.firstName('Saeed');
human.lastName('Neamati');

alert(human.fullName());

Demo at http://jsfiddle.net/gaby/WYjqB/2/

share|improve this answer
    
IE always sucks. Though Microsoft has many good products, but I truly hate Microsoft, only because of its IE. –  Saeed Neamati Oct 17 '11 at 9:11
1  
@Saeed: really, this is one scenario where it isn't Microsoft's fault. Getters and setters are a recent addition to the ECMA-262 specification. IE 9 supports getters and setters via Object.defineProperty(). The implementation you're using (Mozilla's) is non-standard and not guaranteed to work in many browsers anyway. –  Andy E Oct 17 '11 at 9:30
1  
But @Gaby, Firefox has supported this from version 2.0, Chrome from version 1, Safari from version 3.5, and Opera from version 9.5. So, how is that, that IE8 can't support such a thing? –  Saeed Neamati Oct 17 '11 at 9:33
2  
@Saeed: the same reason Firefox doesn't support element.innerText or background-position-x or many other proprietary features of Internet Explorer that Chrome and other browsers have supported for a long time. –  Andy E Oct 17 '11 at 9:49

Check it on http://robertnyman.com/2009/05/28/getters-and-setters-with-javascript-code-samples-and-demos/

The future, and ECMAScript standardized way, of extending objects in all sorts of ways is through Object.defineProperty. This is how Internet Explorer chose to implement getters and setters, but it is unfortunately so far only available in Internet Explorer 8, and not in any other web browser. Also, IE 8 only supports it on DOM nodes, but future versions are planned to support it on JavaScript objects as well.

You can find the test cases on the same site at http://robertnyman.com/javascript/javascript-getters-setters.html#object-defineproperty

Object.defineProperty(document.body, "description", {
    get : function () {
        return this.desc;
    },
    set : function (val) {
        this.desc = val;
    }
});
document.body.description = "Content container";

Result:

document.body.description = "Content container"
share|improve this answer
    
Corrected the result. –  forest Dec 1 '14 at 9:34

IE8 supports getters and setters on DOM nodes, so if you really want to have getters and setters, you can do this:

var objectForIe8 = $("<div></div>")[0];    
Object.defineProperty(objectForIe8, "querySelector", {
    get: function() {
        return this.name;
    },
    set: function(val) {
        this.name = val+", buddy";  
    }
});
// notice you can overwrite dom properties when you want to use that property name
objectForIe8.querySelector = "I'm not your guy"; 

alert(objectForIe8.querySelector);

Note this gives you a somewhat significant performance hit, so I wouldn't use this technique if you need to create thousands of objects like this. But if you're not worried about performance of this particular object, it'll tide you over. And if you couldn't care less about ie8 performance, and just want it to work, use this technique for ie8 only and you're golden : )

share|improve this answer
    
There are several problems with this approach that make it overly complicated and not really worth it. For example, prototypal inheritance goes out of the window, object creation performance issues that you mention, possible naming collisions, and so on. It's far from "golden". –  Andy E Jan 24 '14 at 14:11
    
While not being a golden solution (fat chance of that while using IE), it does in fact answer the question... –  B T Jan 26 '14 at 8:50
1  
Thanks. All I needed was a compact and simple class to store / retrieve values for the duration of the session. This made it easy for me to declare and use properties when needed. –  gouderadrian Feb 14 '14 at 6:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.