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I want to specialize specific function in template class.

Eg:

template<class T>
class A   
{    
public :  
  void fun1(T val);  
  void fun2(T val1, T val2);
};

template <class T>
void A<T>::fun1(T val)
{
  // some task 1;
}


template <class T>
void A<T>::fun2(T val1, T val2)
{
  // some task 2;
}


template <>
void A<char*>::fun2(char* val1, char* val2)
{
  // some task 2 specific to char*;
}

when I do something like this, I get error saying multiple definition for fun2() Please let me why this wrong and also the correct way to implement this.

share|improve this question
    
Compiled and linked successfully for me http://ideone.com/zTdcB. – ks1322 Oct 17 '11 at 9:22
1  
@ks1322, that's because you haven't involved multiple files in ideone. You can try to declare this code in .h file and then include that in 2 .cpp files. You will get linker error. – iammilind Oct 17 '11 at 9:26
    
@Rahul the redefinition error (depends on a compiler) is due to the fact that in your full specialization a.k.a explicit specialization you're providing as a template param char* and when this param is substituted during initialization of primary template then there is fun2 already decl/def and T will be substituted for char* – There is nothing we can do Oct 17 '11 at 9:26
    
@Rahul what you should do is to provide full class template specialization for char* and there define fnc fun2 with char* as arguments. – There is nothing we can do Oct 17 '11 at 9:28
    
Also works fine on MSVC10. – ComicSansMS Oct 17 '11 at 9:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your method fun2() is not a template method as itself, though it's a member of a template class. I don't find the proper technical term but in simple words, specializing fun2() will create an effect of a normal function definition. Putting the definition in header file will give you multiple definition error.

To solve this problem, just put an inline keyword and the linker error will go away!

template <> inline // <----- 'inline' will prompt to generate only 1 copy
void A<char*>::fun2(char* val1, char* val2)
{
  // some task 2 specific to char*;
}

Edit: This solves the linker error. But still you cannot use the A<char*>::fun2. Ultimately it boils down to the very fact that you need to specialize the whole class A<char*> or overload the fun2(char*, char*) within A<T>

template<class T>
class A
{
  // constructors
public:
  //...
  void fun2(char* val1, char* val2)
  {
    //specific case when T = char*
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ..i worked. – Rahul Oct 17 '11 at 9:37

I would suggest the following approach. Define a private function template called implementation to handle the general case, and overload (not specialize) implementation to handle the specific case when T=char*. Then from fun2(), call implementation passing a third argument as shown below. The correct implementation will be selected based on the template argument T:

template<class T>
class A   
{    
    template<typename U> struct selector{};

    public :  
        void fun1(T val);  
        void fun2(T val1, T val2)
        {
            //forward the call
            //a correct function will be selected automatically based on T
            implementation(val1, val2, selector<T>());
        }
   private:
        template<typename U>
        void implementation(T & val1, T & val2, const selector<U> &)
        {
           //general case!
        }
        void implementation(T & val1, T & val2, const selector<char*> &)
        {
           //specific case when T = char*
        }
};

The third argument of type selector<T> (or selector<char*>) helps selecting the correct implementation.

share|improve this answer
1  
and this I believe is best approach for this kind of scenario although some people like to provide different specializations +1. – There is nothing we can do Oct 17 '11 at 9:31

Split your code accordingly and it should work, for example:

A.h

template<class T>
class A   
{    
    public :  
        void fun1(T val);  
        void fun2(T val1, T val2);

};

template <class T>
void A<T>::fun1(T val)
{
  // some task 1;
}


template <class T>
void A<T>::fun2(T val1, T val2)
{
  // some task 2;
}

A.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "A.h"

template <>
void A<char *>::fun2(char* val1, char* val2)
{
  // some task 2 specific to char*;
  std::cout << "char*::fun2" << std::endl;
}

Amain.cpp

#include <iostream>    
#include "A.h"

int main()
{
  A<char*> a;

  char* c= 0;
  char* d= 0;

  a.fun2(c, d);
}

Compile and link, and it should do the right thing...

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Thanks for the reply. I just made fun2() inline and worked fine. – Rahul Oct 17 '11 at 9:38

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