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I am having problems with this Python program I am creating to do maths, working out and so solutions but I'm getting the syntaxerror: "unexpected character after line continuation character in python"

this is my code

print("Length between sides: "+str((length*length)*2.6)+" \ 1.5 = "+str(((length*length)*2.6)\1.5)+" Units")

My problem is with \1.5 I have tried \1.5 but it doesn't work

Using python 2.7.2

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The division operator is /, not \

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2  
Now I feel rather stupid, but thank you. –  Arcticfoxx Oct 17 '11 at 10:21
    
I switched to using *0.666666667 then I saw this...I might just stick to what I have written now. –  Arcticfoxx Oct 17 '11 at 10:37
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The division operator is / rather than \.

Also, the backslash has a special meaning inside a Python string. Either escape it with another backslash:

"\\ 1.5 = "`

or use a raw string

r" \ 1.5 = "
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Thank you for the reply –  Arcticfoxx Oct 17 '11 at 10:24
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The backslash \ is the line continuation character the error message is talking about, and after it, only newline characters/whitespace are allowed (before the next non-whitespace continues the "interrupted" line.

print "This is a very long string that doesn't fit" + \
      "on a single line"

Outside of a string, a backslash can only appear in this way. For division, you want a slash: /.

If you want to write a verbatim backslash in a string, escape it by doubling it: "\\"

In your code, you're using it twice:

 print("Length between sides: " + str((length*length)*2.6) +
       " \ 1.5 = " +                   # inside a string; treated as literal
       str(((length*length)*2.6)\1.5)+ # outside a string, treated as line cont
                                       # character, but no newline follows -> Fail
       " Units")
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Thank you for the reply –  Arcticfoxx Oct 17 '11 at 10:23
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Well, what do you try to do? If you want to use division, use "/" not "\". If it is something else, explain it in a bit more detail, please.

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As the others already mentioned: the division operator is / rather than **. If you wanna print the ** character within a string you have to escape it:

print("foo \\")
# will print: foo \

I think to print the string you wanted I think you gonna need this code:

print("Length between sides: " + str((length*length)*2.6) + " \\ 1.5 = " + str(((length*length)*2.6)/1.5) + " Units")

And this one is a more readable version of the above (using the format method):

message = "Length between sides: {0} \\ 1.5 = {1} Units"
val1 = (length * length) * 2.6
val2 = ((length * length) * 2.6) / 1.5
print(message.format(val1, val2))
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